All posts by Raymond Miller

82nd Airborne Division Small Arms Master Gunner: primary weapons trainer, force modernization for individual weapons, and range liason for the 82nd.

STRAC Continued

As we discussed DA PAM 350-38 (also known as the STRAC) and how it affects training for the paratrooper. I am now going to go on a talk through of how to use this publication to figure your round allocation for the year for a company. You can find the STRAC at the following link: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0ByiIPNyo3GLUeENlb3lGSVU5OHM Take the Infantry company we discussed before; we have 118 paratroopers with M4's in it. The Chapter of DA PAM 350-38 that we would reference would be chapter 5 (Infantry). Adobe page 151 gives us the first STRAC table we reference, which is table 5-2. The way this table is set up is the frequency gives the number of times in one year your individual paratrooper will receive this Ammunition. In the case of zero ammunition for the M4A1, they are allocated 18 rounds, twice a year (Frequency under the AC column). If I keep following the table down, it shows under various conditions, with CCO, without CCO, With Engagement Skills Trainer, Without Engagement Skills Trainer. At the bottom of the table, it gives you what the total is, based on Weapon/optic combination type. So Someone with an M150 RCO (also known as the

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DA Pam 350-38 (Standards in Training Commision)

For this discussion on Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures, I will be discussing DA Pam 350-38 (Standards in Training Commision). This book is used in conjunction with TC 3-20.0 (Integrated Weapons Training Strategy, May 2015). Both of these books are the bible for the amount of ammunition that individuals are supposed to shoot in a given year. STRAC is broken down based off of unit type. Chapter 2 covers Armor units and Armored Cavalry Squadrons, Chapter 3 covers artillery units, Chapter 4 covers Air Defense Artillery units, Chapter 5 covers all versions of Infantry units (ABCT, SBCT, IBCT) for active, and guard components, Chapter 6 covers Engineers, Chapter 7 covers Aviation, Chapter 8 Covers Military Police, and Chapter 9 Covers Sustainment and Support Weapons Systems. Chapter 10 covers ammunition allocations for Combat Training Centers and Deployment Exercises, Chapter 11 Covers SOCOM, Chapter 12 Covers Contingency Operations and Mobilization guidance for National Guard and Reserve. This book is revised annually based on changes made by the council of colonels. Now that we have the basic information on what STRAC is, what does it do for the Paratrooper? This publication lets the Airborne leader know how many rounds they are allocated for training,

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Shot Process: Stability

Today we will be discussing the first functional element of the shot process: Stability. While some would say that stability is the most important element, we want our paratroopers to realize that all these elements need to work together in order to achieve a hit where they are aiming at. TC 3-22.9 states that stability 'is provided through four functions: support, muscle relaxation, natural point of aim, and recoil management. These functions provide the Soldier the means to best stabilize the weapon during the engagement process.' Support is provided either by the Paratrooper's body (natural means), or by artificial means (e.g. a tripod) Either of these will work, what the paratrooper needs to take into consideration when employing these forms of support is how much time they have to assume the position, and how stable a platform that natural or artificial support provides. When assuming a position, the paratrooper will work out a pre-shot routine as a part of their shot process. This is recommended when you have the time to take a well-aimed shot, or when you are zeroing. The Paratrooper should have a defined start point (e.g. starting at the non-firing hand or the feet) and work their

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