All posts by Nate Osborne

Nathan Osborne began a serious study of shooting in 2012 when taking the "Citizens use of Deadly Force" class with Massad Ayoob. Being able to drink from the fire-hose in class started a desire to learn as much as possible, and hopefully be a source of quality information to others. In addition to attending and working as staff with the Massad Ayoob Group, Nate has taken classes with John Chapman, Earnest Langdon, Chris Costa, and others, and will never be able to go to classes from every instructor on his 'to attend' list. He is also a Glock and S&W M&P Armorer. Nate currently manages a gun range in Northern Utah while finishing a master's degree, and running a weekly practical pistol match.

Critical Equipment

This article began as some thoughts when I was listening to the P&S Kyle Defoor interview a few months ago, and I am finally putting thoughts on paper (or the internet’s version of paper). “Tell me about your rifle” (here) was Kyle’s question that started me thinking. On a similar vein, more handgun-focused, was the phrase “tell me a story about your pistol.” Ask yourself “How confident am I in my gear?” In that worst case scenario where a failure of your gear means grave bodily injury or death, can you count on it all the time, every time? If not, why not? How can you bring your gear up to that level of trust? Watching videos of many violent encounters, you quickly realize how vital the opening moments are. As someone closes distance, can you guarantee that your handgun is where it should be? Will it have fallen out, shifted position drastically, or otherwise become unavailable? When you press the trigger, how sure are you that the gun will fire, and that is will hit at the point of aim of your sights? If you grab your rifle, is your optic going to be on? Will it have shifted to

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Opportunity Cost

This article begins in 2012, when I joined m4carbine.net.  It seemed to me to be a gathering of solid people giving out solid advice, so I started reading.  From what I have heard since, I really missed out on the heyday of M4C, just like I missed Lightfighter but I digress.  The threads were still there and I did, and still do, learn much from what is written over there.   On many occasions, a newer member would post about purchasing “my first AR,” and was looking for advice on what to buy for it.  The answer, it seemed, was like a broken record: “get some training, and get some ammo.”  In principle I understood, but I too began to be slightly annoyed at the repetition.  “I get it,” I would think, “you are all burning it down with rifles, and you want this guy learning his stuff before buying the gadgets.”  Then I started working on a gun range, later becoming the facility manager.  My eyes were opened, the clouds parted, and the angels sang! The reasons for this oft-repeated phrase became crystal clear. I now want to explain this “get some training, get some ammo” mindset, at least

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