All posts by Dan Guy

Skill Drills vs. Scenario Training

I was inspired to write this article because of a curious phenomenon known as the Dunning-Kruger Effect. This describes how a person’s knowledge of a subject and their self-perceived expertise are inversely proportional. So a person with very little knowledge of a subject often think that they know much more about a subject than they actually do. And a true expert often believes that what s/he knows is common knowledge. This is seen in a medical community with people who self-diagnose based off a five minute search on Web MD and then argue with actual medical professionals when care is sought. This is also seen in the firearms community all the time. Joe Anybody hears something at the gun shop, or reads something on an internet forum or FaceBook page. Joe Anybody then proclaims his new found truth for all to hear. He even corrects those who have much more experience and knowledge because Joe doesn’t know what he doesn’t know and in his mind he is an expert. On the other end I’ve had numerous Special Forces soldiers tell me “If I can do it anyone can.” I appreciate the humility, but you only have to look as far

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AAR’s for Scenario Based Training: How to and Why

AAR. What is it? After Action Review is the short answer. Why do we do them? Because we have to. Because we’re supposed to. First Sergeant said to. Because I like to hear myself talk. The correct answer should be to give the students (soldiers, cops, whoever) feedback on their performance, to facilitate learning and to make them better. As a young infantryman I hated AARs, I felt like they were just a waste of my time. I would rather be training, or eating, or sleeping, or playing grab ass. These, many moons later, I feel quite differently about it. I honestly think that AARs are only slightly less important than the actual training itself, but only if done correctly. Over the years it has become clear to me that most people simply don’t know how to conduct an AAR. I don’t recall ever being given specific training on how to conduct one. And if you ask me to sit through one like I used to have to endure, I’ll still think it’s a waste of time. An AAR gives the students time to reflect on what happened, what they did, what they did well, and what they could have

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