Category Archives: Equipment

Gear & Equipment (Stuff that helps us accomplish the mission)

Why I Have A Red Dot On My Pistol – Part 2

After receiving a lot of great feedback regarding my first offering, I decided to write a follow up article based on the questions I received. Again, I want to reiterate that I am by no means a subject matter expert. I am sharing this as a regular guy that trains a lot (400 to 600 rounds a week) and carries my gun all the time. The info I am sharing is my personal experience influenced/learned/inspired by the instructors I have trained with, the research I have done, and the product of the drills and exercises I have done ad nauseum to test them. “Nothing. Nothing. Nothing.” – Cam at F3 Tactical when asked what he thinks you need to change in regards to draw stroke, concealment, and weight difference with RDS on pistols. Added weight With modern miniature red dot weight is a non-issue. A Trijicon RMR is 1.2 oz. A Leupold Deltapoint is .6 oz, and the huge “impractical” (according to the interwebz)  Aimpoint H1/T1 is a whopping 3 oz. After you subtract the material removed from milling your slide and add back a mounting plate, the RMR and Deltapoint are at a net weight gain of zero and

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Why I Have A Red Dot On My Pistol – Part 1

Red Dot Sights (RDS) are possibly the single biggest innovation on the pistol platform in recent years. But just like any “new” thing, it has its evangelists and its naysayers. Is it a valuable tool to help you protect you and your loved ones or is it just an expensive accessory to live out your Han Solo fantasy? In the following discussion I will provide some personal insight as to why I feel this is the future of pistols and why you should or should not consider having one. First off, a little background on me….. I am just a regular guy. I am not an LEO or a veteran. I am an NRA certified instructor (but who isn’t these days) and, more importantly, an avid (actually obsessive) researcher of everything self-defense. This obsession has led me to train and compete throughout my life in Martial Arts such as TKD and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. I say this because through my combative arts training in the Metro DC area I have had the pleasure of training with many active/retired military, and LEO (local, state and federal). These friends ignited my passion in firearms and made me realize firearms manipulation is just another

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Being Prepared For All Seasons: Through Layer Selection

When dressing before I head out, I like to ask myself, "can I reasonably change a tire, dressed as I am, with the full range of weather and temperatures for today?" From time to time, we must all deal with weather-effects outside of our norm, while still taking on tasks and problems. This may happen with a sudden and unexpected change of the weather, from deficiencies in packing or preparation, or as relates to modern travel options: it is extremely easy for the individual to move across a broad geographic area very quickly; whether by planes, tranes, or automobiles; and thus to encounter quite the variety of conditions. For example: I recently went from a week spent in temperate North Africa, to a few hours in a wintry East Coast city, before I spent a week and a half in northern New England as several snowstorms worked their way through; the net transition time between these three locations was about 12 hours. When unexpected circumstances displaced me without notice, what I had on-hand for contingency positively influenced the outcome. Layering strategies apply at all times of year, and this must include having provision to up-layer. For best effects, we must

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What is quality?

  What is quality? According to the American Society of Quality, quality is - 1. the characteristics of a product or service that bear on its ability to satisfy stated or implied needs; 2. a product or service free of deficiencies in“fitness for use;” or in a “conformance to requirements.” You see the problem lies in a consuming public not knowing what really constitutes well made gear. If you have condor gear in any color outside of multicam or ATACS AU and it was purchased between 2012-2013 then chances are it was made with us made MC and Atacs raw fabric out of Duro and Schott Performance. That said, the geometry and methods used to construct their products are substandard at best with frequent deviations from specifications (most noticeably in PALS channel formation) Sometimes the stitch length is as big as 4 stitches per inch on major surfaces up to 6 SPI, when your break strength is about 11lbs per stitch it does count when you start applying a warload. Take a ruler alongside your stitches and see for yourself. .. measure the pals Webbing too, 1.5" on center, 1" gap in between Rarely do you see any reinforcement to

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Tactical, cold, wind, rain, survive.

Here are some things to consider regarding layering and desolate areas. The land of many mountains, high desert and high winds can make for a challenging way to manage your body heat while working with tacti-cool gear. The critical issue is to maintain a balance of body core temperature and also minimize perspiration which will accelerate dehydration and also can be an issue with evaporative cooling when you don’t want it to happen. Here is what I use, some of it is commercial mountaineering gear and some is military gear. I mix and match because I don’t always want to look like a barrel chested freedom fighter (Kilimanjaro, Africa) and frankly I like lightweight gear for my wilderness operations- it allows me to move faster. As long as the colors are muted, such as drabs, khakis, grays, etc. I will use it. I made a switch away from polypro and capilene about ten years ago. I have favored merino wool due to its lightweight, non-funk smell and it works in hot and cold weather. I have a variety of merino thin bottoms from Patagonia, Smartwool, Helley Hansen and the like. I prefer thin layers of wool next to my skin

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Slings – a very general overview

In regards to slings, there are those with experience that know the way things work and there are those without experience that make decisions based on peer pressure or appearances. Slings are to a carbine as holsters are to a handgun. Slings are a needed piece of equipment. There are essentally three main types of slings (five if you count Chalker and Hybrids). Three point, two point, and single point slings. Three points are unnecessarily complex. They provide a greater degree of retention and control compared to a single point. The extra lengths of strap can get in the way of basic weapon controls. Locking the gun down is not possible nor is adjustment on the fly. Transitions are not affected by a three point. Single points allow much more free movement at the expense of control and retention. Switching shoulders is an easier task with single points. Transitions are problematic due to how they fall. Lack of control of the weapon with hands on, medical applications, using flashbangs, dragging wounded, etc is less than optimal. Two points (preferably adjustable) allow for easier transitions. The ability to cinch the weapon to your body for hands on tasks is beneficial. The

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