Holster Positioning – An Unpopular View

Holster positioning and corresponding equipment seem to be a topic that comes up often. Though this may appear to be common sense to some, not everyone is at the same level of experience. So let's break this down in simple terms. Positioning, attire, belt, and holster all work together as an effective system or an ineffective hindrance. Without a quality belt and quality holster, the position of your holster on your belt may not be as optimal as you would hope. If you don't dress to carry, you might be doing yourself a disservice. Obviously we aren't all built the same. Body types differ - this is all coming from a 6'5" 250 lb person. Starting from 6 o'clock (small of back) and moving the weapon to 12 o'clock (appendix), as you move forward from 6 to 12 you gain positive benefits. Small of back does not provide awareness of the weapon (you don't know if it is concealed), it prints horribly if you bend, it is slow to access, and it is difficult to defend. Even worse, it can cause serious injury if the wearer falls on their back. Strongside provides better awareness of the weapon, it allows less printing

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Matt Landfair
Lead Editor/Contributor at Primary & Secondary
Active Law Enforcement background since before the turn of the century in the middle of no where. Firearms instructor, armorer, hangs out at DARC, has attended numerous training courses including DARC, Follow Through Consulting, EAG, TMacs, and more boring mandatory popo training you can shake a stick at. He has written for RECOIL Magazine, Breach Bang Clear, Soldier Systems Daily and Monderno. Enjoys long walks on the beach, blah blah blah… Known as Matt Prime or Riafdnal in some circles.

Matt@primaryandsecondary.com

Raven Concealment Copia Magazine Pouches

In mid 2016 Raven Concealment announced the Copia Pistol Magazine pouches. The Copia is a one size fits most injection molded (edited) pistol mag pouch. You can adjust the tension of the mag pouch to work with various sizes mags – i.e. Glock to M&P and back to the chosen gun, Glock. The mag pouches are ambidextrous as well, allowing one mag pouch to have bullets forward or rearward. Available in a single mag or double mag option, you are not limited by this. You can add them together using the standard coupling hardware we all got used to using with the Phantom series. This means that a single mag pouch can be added to another to make a double, or a double and a single together become a triple. I was not a fan of kydex or “hard” mag pouches for a concealed carry role, as I rarely wear a tucked in undershirt. Due to this, almost every concealment friendly belt mag pouches would rub against my skin and be very annoying. The Copia hasn’t done that in the 6 months I’ve used the single mag as a daily wear pouch. Part of this is the Copia having a

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Matt Levi
Contributor at Primary & Secondary
Over 7 years in Law Enforcement. Matt Has a background in firearms and firearms training, and has been trying to learn from those with more knowledge and experience than he. This has involved recognizing that he needs to attend outside training and has led him to take training with Vickers Tactical, DARC, LMS Defense and others.

Inches, Minutes, Clicks- Zero That Blaster

Zeroing is literally one of the most important thing we need to accomplish with our rifles and #spacegun pistols. There is much talk around the technique to accomplish this but there is one way that is easy and fast. First, determine the desired zero distance.  This will vary by rifle, optic, caliber, and most importantly purpose of the firearm. Many people with AR15 rifles use either a 100, 200, or 300 yard/meter zero. Rather, many people claim to use those ranges but most use the near zero distance on either 25 or 50-yard target. Yes, I am talking in yards here because most people on this page are not using meters. Now, to save yourself time, you can use a borelight or something like the Telluric Group Small Arms Collimator. There are lasers available in every price range and should be part of your tool kit. Doing this step will put you at the very least on paper at 25/50 which will save you rounds and frustration. Ask me how I know. Regardless of borelight or not, it’s time to shoot bullets. Get into the most comfortable and stable position possible. One that you can duplicate easily. For you Army

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Ash Hess
Senior NCO in the US Army currently serving as the Senior Writer for Small Arms in the Weapons and Gunnery Branch at the Maneuver Center of Excellence Fort Benning, Georgia .
Army Schools include US Army Master Marksmanship Trainer Course, Rifle Marksmanship Instructor Course, Urban Combat Leaders Course, Air Assault, Rappelmaster, Senior Leaders Course, Army Basic Instructor course, High Angle Marksmanship Course, and Unit Armorer course.

Has also attended the TigerSwan Basic Carbine course, Defoor Proformance Advanced Carbine and Scoped Rifle courses, Sionics Weapon Systems M4 Armorer course, and the MDTS Practical Small Knife 1course.

Four combat tours totaling fifty-two months overseas.

B.E. Meyers & Co. Inc. Releases MAWL-C1+™ Laser Aiming Device for Commercial Sale

March 7th, 2017 (Redmond, WA) – The Commercial Market Spoke, and We Listened  Since the release of the MAWL-DA™ laser device to the military and law enforcement community in 2016, B.E. Meyers & Co. Inc. has received numerous requests for a civilian legal variant of the MAWL™.  Today we are proud to be able to support these requests by introducing the MAWL-C1+™ commercial laser device.  The C1+ variant is not the typical “Class 1” laser device, and this is the first time that a laser illuminator is available to the shooting community that is not only functional for night target engagement at distance, and exceeds the performance of other commercial systems. MAWL™ Design The MAWL-C1+ has all the sought-after ergonomic design features of the MAWL-DA, allowing for quick operation in the dark and on the move.  In under a second, using only the tip of your thumb, the laser can be manipulated from near to far and back again between short range, mid-range, and long range specific settings.  With low-profile activation buttons centered at just 0.37” above the rail, the MAWL design offers an unparalleled combination of range adjustment and speed of use. Class 1 Plus™ = Irradiance on Target

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Primary & Secondary
Primary & Secondary is a network created to discuss professional grade modern weapons and their applications with supporting equipment and skills.

Battle of Takur Ghar

15 years ago today, my amazing husband was the platoon sergeant in charge of a 65 man Ranger strike force from 1st Ranger Battalion deployed to Afghanistan 🇦🇫 in 2001. Chuck's element due to circumstances beyond his control were split between the two largest bases in Afghanistan. Early on the morning of the 4th the half of Chuck's Platoon that were with the Platoon Leader at the other base were sent to a mountain top to rescue a Navy Seal unit pinned down in a fire fight. When Chuck's guys got to the mountain, the SEALS had retreated, and only the enemy remained. They shot down their helicopter and killed three of Chuck's guys. Marc Anderson, Brad Crose, and Matthew Commons were among the 7 Americans killed. Chuck's youngest Son, Jack Matthew is named after Matt Commons. Three books and a motion picture have been written about the event where chuck's Rangers received the most valor medals for a group it's size for a single action since the Vietnam war. Chuck was forever scarred by this terrible event, the loss of life of his men, and the fact that he was not able to be with them during the battle.

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Guest Contributor
This contributor is a member of the Primary & Secondary Network.

A Reminder for Myself and Other Instructors

A lot of times, we take our own repetitions for granted.  As we're teaching, it's easy to become frustrated with students that "just aren't getting it."  And since I'm a nobody, instructor-wise, I get a lot of students that are prone to "just not getting it."  A lot of the top level national guys get students who've trained at a high level before.  And so it's easy to have a line full of switched-on guys that have already built tens of thousands of reps.  We come to those national guys, most of the time, with years if not decades of firearms experience. As a student on their lines, I love that.  We aren't held up by a number of students who are just really slow to pick up some basic concept that we started workin on 20 years ago.  And as a student, it's really easy to get frustrated with "that person" in the class.  You know the one.  The Private Pyles of the class.  We've all seen it.  We've all been frustrated by it. But today, I've had a stark lesson in why we should never let that frustration show, and really, should soften our thinking on it. I

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Guest Contributor
This contributor is a member of the Primary & Secondary Network.

Running the Irons.

Iron sights have been part of shooting since the very least April 19th 1775. Aiming was a major part of our tactics that helped defeat the British unaimed volley fire. This being said, it should come as no surprise that we have learned, used, and lost uses for iron sights in all environments from jungles, deserts and even the frozen landscapes of Siberia. I am going to talk about a few of those techniques here. First anyone ever wonder why there are 2 apertures on the M16/AR15 platform? Most people have looked and wondered but never cared. Some wondered then tried switching between the two and found no gain from it. There is a reason for it but first we need to talk about sight alignment. Photo courtesy of FMJ Armory, LaGrange, GA TC 3-22.9 states “sight alignment is the relationship between the aiming device and the firer’s eye. To achieve proper and effective aim, the focus of the firer’s eye needs to be on the front sight post or reticle. The Soldier must maintain sight alignment throughout the aiming process.” It goes on to say for iron sights it is the “the relationship between the

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Ash Hess
Senior NCO in the US Army currently serving as the Senior Writer for Small Arms in the Weapons and Gunnery Branch at the Maneuver Center of Excellence Fort Benning, Georgia .
Army Schools include US Army Master Marksmanship Trainer Course, Rifle Marksmanship Instructor Course, Urban Combat Leaders Course, Air Assault, Rappelmaster, Senior Leaders Course, Army Basic Instructor course, High Angle Marksmanship Course, and Unit Armorer course.

Has also attended the TigerSwan Basic Carbine course, Defoor Proformance Advanced Carbine and Scoped Rifle courses, Sionics Weapon Systems M4 Armorer course, and the MDTS Practical Small Knife 1course.

Four combat tours totaling fifty-two months overseas.

Malfunctions

We are continuing our discussion on Control. Specifically, we will be addressing how to handle malfunctions, which is a particular part of the shot process that was not addressed under the fundamentals. Our Reference for this discussion is TC 3-22.9 Change 1, dated January 2017. A malfunction is anything that occurs to interrupt the cycle of function of the weapon. The TC describes it as: “The Soldier controls which actions must be taken to ensure the [threat] is defeated as quickly as possible based on secondary weapon availability and capability, and the level of threat presented by the range of the [threat] and its capability.” This means that the Paratrooper needs to determine how to most effectively neutralize the threat based on their assessment. They do this in one of three ways: Their secondary weapon to can eliminate the threat, their secondary weapon cannot eliminate the threat, or they have no secondary weapon to transition too. We will discuss each of these separately. If the Paratrooper has a secondary weapon, and they believe they can neutralize the threat with it, they will transition to that weapon. Secondary weapons are usually a pistol for an M240 Gunner or the M4 Carbine

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Raymond Miller
82nd Airborne Division Small Arms Master Gunner: primary weapons trainer, force modernization for individual weapons, and range liason for the 82nd.

Understanding the AR-15 Gas System

The AR-15 Direct Gas Impingement System is a rather straight forward system to understand. When the weapon is fired, gas travels down the barrel behind the bullet. As it passes the gas port, it is diverted into the Front Sight Base (FSB) or Gas Block into a gas tube which carries it into the bolt carrier key. Once the gas arrives at the key, it dumps the gas into a chamber causing the bolt carrier to move rearward.                                              (Elements of the gas system) Gassing starts in the chamber with the round of ammunition. This means that ammunition selection is important. Ammunition may be loaded to either .223 specs or 5.56 NATO specs. Ammunition produced with poor quality control can affect the operation of the weapon. From here we move to the gas port. The gas port is very important to the overall function of the rifle. In the military world this is virtually a non-issue since gas ports are standardized. In the commercial/civilian world a manufacturer can gas their barrel anyway they want. One of the first things

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William Larson
Owner/Instructor at Semper Paratus Arms, LLC
Will Larson is a veteran of the U.S. Army Infantry and the U.S. Coast Guard where he served as a Gunner's Mate. After leaving the military with almost 10 years of military service he entered into the world of contracting working primarily in Iraq and Afghanistan for 6 years. He is the owner/instructor for Semper Paratus Arms, LLC which teaches AR-15 based armorer and builder courses and he is the master armorer for SIONICS Weapon Systems in Tucson, Arizona. He has completed numerous factory and field armorer courses and a variety shooting courses and has close to 30 years of experience with the AR-15 family of weapons.

Follow Through With the M4 and M4A1

We are continuing our discussion on control. Specifically we will be addressing Follow-through for the M4 and M4A1 platforms. The Reference for this discussion is TC 3-22.9 Change 1 dated January 2017. The M4 series weapon has a variable trigger weight due to the burst trigger control group. The weight can vary as much as three to eight pounds depending upon where the sear is at in the burst cycle. So how do we compensate for that variable trigger pull? The answer is follow-through. Follow-through is the continued application of the shot process until after the shot has been fired. This means that the Paratrooper keeps applying the elements of the shot process until the weapon ceases movement from the recoil pulse. A practical application of follow-through is keeping the head in the same position, firing eye (or both eyes open, in the case of the CCO and RCO), and holds the trigger back until the recoil pulse ceases, then lets off enough to allow the trigger to reset. Body position remains the same, and breathing is either steady or held, depending upon the conditions of the particular shot. There are nine components to follow-through, they are Recoil Management, Recoil

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Raymond Miller
82nd Airborne Division Small Arms Master Gunner: primary weapons trainer, force modernization for individual weapons, and range liason for the 82nd.

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