Tag Archives: training

The Basics of Hosting a Training Class

By Adam Syfrett Many people entertain the idea of playing host to a professional instructor, in the hopes of potentially mitigating some of their own personal logistical hurdles that would be involved in travelling to seek training. Others seek to do it just for the free spot in class. If these are your only motivations for being a host, I invite you to reconsider your train of thought. Playing host to a class places logistical and organizational demands on you far and away above attending one. That is not to say that the juice is not worth the squeeze. Having played host now to several instructors, I’ve greatly increased my own scope of knowledge, and circle of friends. The most obvious need for playing host is some sort of range facility. The facilities you have access to will play a critical role in the sort of classes you can host. Talk to the range owner/board, and see what sort of classes they are comfortable having their name associated with as well. If a certain class you want to host has something as a part of its plan of instruction (POI) that is against range rules-such as drawing from concealment, or

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AAR: FOLLOW THROUGH CONSULTING – SCOPED CARBINE (Part Four: Day Three/Conclusion)

Follow Through Consulting Scoped Carbine Class Teasdale, UT  March 18 - 20, 2016 By: Seth Young Continued from Part 3: Day Two. Training Day 3 - Sunday After a quick breakfast at the Lodge we met at the LaRue targets at 9:30am. Buck took us through more barricade drills focusing on the approach and setup. On my turn Buck had me knock down the four LaRue targets on the close cliff face, then we displace to another barricade to engage silhouette targets further out. Two of them were about 500 meters away. I had 4 MOA dialed onto my scope for the drill and held on the top of the LaRue target heads with good results. For the two at 500 meters I had to hold an additional 5 MOA over them to make the hits. After each of us went through the barricade drill we walked with Buck up the trail to the area we used for the low light scenario the night before. It was surprising to see how close the targets at the second camp fire looked compared to the way they looked the night before. Buck told us a story about one of his experiences getting

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AAR: FOLLOW THROUGH CONSULTING – SCOPED CARBINE (Part Three: Day Two)

Follow Through Consulting Scoped Carbine Class Teasdale, UT  March 18 - 20, 2016 By: Seth Young Continued from Part 2: Day One. Training Day 2 - Saturday We met back at the lodge at noon and caravanned to Flat Range #1. I really wanted to get some experience with the Tremor2 reticle using it like it was designed to be used. Buck was kind enough to let me borrow his 16" AXTS carbine with Leupold 3-18x44 Tremor2 scope. Like the previous day we cycled through the 12" plates doing the milling drill. I noticed that the wind really pushed the 223 bullets around a lot more than the heavy 7.62 bullets I was using the day before. The wind wasn't as bad as TD1, but it was enough to need the wind dots on the Tremor 2 reticle. Like the previous day, we cycled through as a group with each shooter getting two shots to hit a plate, then moved on to the next plate as a group. Buck shows how to use the speed shooting formula on the Tremor2 reticle. AXTS carbine with Nightforce 4-16 scope with Tremon3 reticle. Magpul D60 drum fed over watch. After the 12" drill

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AAR: Follow Through Consulting – Scoped Carbine (Part Two: Day One)

Follow Through Consulting Scoped Carbine Class Teasdale, UT  March 18 - 20, 2016 By: Seth Young Continued from Part One: Part One. Training Day 1 - Friday In the morning we met at the cozy Red River Ranch lodge. After a delicious breakfast we met downstairs in the classroom for initial instruction. Buck gave us a bit on his background and experience as a certified marine MCLMM. He laid out the intent of the class: marksmanship fundamentals (i.e. 'gunfighting') in a practical/operational environment. To do that Buck focuses on three areas:  Move, Shoot, and Communicate. I would really encourage everyone to take a class from Buck to get the in-depth explanation on those topics. Buck does a great job of conveying through his experience the "what, how, and why" of each of the points listed under the tree topics. Move, Shoot, and Communicate Next we talked about Buck's preferred way to quickly engage targets outside of CQB (further than 300m): Todd Hodnett's speed shooting formula. This is a method for quickly measuring a target using the reticle then going directly to a hold-over without calculating distance to target as an intermediate step. The H59, Tremor2, and Tremor3 reticles are set

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AAR: Follow Through Consulting – Scoped Carbine (Part One: Introduction)

Follow Through Consulting Scoped Carbine Class Teasdale, UT  March 18 - 20, 2016 By: Seth Young Introduction One of my favorite weekend activities is hiking up into the mountains and target shooting. In order to continue developing this hobby I've taken several DMR/SPR style classes by now. A few have been small local get-togethers down at the fabulous high-desert North Spring range in Price, UT. Another was the Magpul Dynamics DMR/SPR class at Sniper Country in Tremonton, UT. Off the top of my head I can think of several individuals I know that do much more hiking, shooting, and hunting in mountain / high-desert regions than I do, but here are my observations and experiences as an outdoors enthusiast at the Follow Through Consulting Scoped Carbine class in Teasdale, Utah. Instructor Buck Doyle is the owner and instructor of Follow Through Consulting. From his website: "Buck Doyle served over 21 years in the US Marine Corps, including 17 years and multiple combat tours with Special Operations units. As a Reconnaissance Marine attached to 1st Force Recon, 1st Recon BN, and MARSOC units, Doyle served as Team Leader, Platoon Sergeant, and Chief Instructor at Special Missions Training Branch. He has current,

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AAR – Vehicle Close Quarters Battle Instructor with William Petty

Class: Vehicle Close Quarters Battle (VCQB) Instructor Instructor: William Petty Location: 88 Tactical Lodge Tekamah, Nebraska March 29th to April 1st, 2016 *Most of the photos are from Mellor Photography and were provided to students for personal use*   Disclaimer: First off, to ensure everything is on the up and up, I received a compensated slot to attend this class. Second, I paid out of pocket for my airfare, rental car and ammunition to attend.   What is VCQB? It is the name of the curriculum that has stuck. It is close quarter’s engagements around vehicles – hence Vehicle Close Quarters Battle. Generally the term CQB has been applied to fighting inside a house, but Petty had to come up with a name and this is what he came up with. The program is specifically focused on Law Enforcement use. That said, if your life takes you around vehicles, you could apply some of the lessons learned.   Due to weather affecting my cross-country travel, I missed out on the morning and first half of the afternoon on training day one. As such I was unable to learn much about Petty’s BIO other than what he has posted on the

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An Armed Citizen’s Guide to the Online Firearms Galaxy

The internet is a wide open space with few rules and little supervision. Things in the real world such as credibility, lineage, and integrity can easily be counterfeited on the net and replaced with followers, likes, and SEO. If your hobby is of little consequence like, let’s say watch collecting, then the detriment in following the advice of false experts reaches no further than a monetary loss. Conversely, following the advice of a self-appointed snake-oil salesman peddling tactical garbage can have far more grave consequences.<br> But how does an unwashed, firearms neophyte find reliable, vetted info on the interwebs? How does one ask questions in Facebook groups, forums, etc. without getting smacked down? How does one avoid cultish dogma that inhibits evolution and adaptability? What the f*ck does “Stay in your lane” mean anyway? This article will be a quick attempt to help those self-defense minded yet novice citizens traverse the dangerous fjords of the internet to find useful information regarding their training and gear choices. <br> Why Should You Listen to Me? <br> Here is your first lesson. Vet the person. Before you decide to listen, employ, use or buy information from a person it is imperative to do

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The Need For A Mentor

“Surround yourself with those smarter than you.” I’ve heard variants of this saying many times in various venues. Sometimes it was narrowly focused – “you are a new boot and don’t know anything so listen to senior officers” – and other times it was more focused on learning as much as possible from others. A post a few years back on another forum got me to rethink events like tradeshows – NTOA, SHOT, etc. The poster (Moose) summarized how the show wasn’t about what new stuff was out, but about the contacts and informal learning opportunities.   Finding Subject Matter Experts – SME, is important. When someone is qualified to talk about a subject, they are worth learning from. However, just because they are qualified to talk about X, doesn’t mean their opinions on Y and Z are valid. Neither does it mean that their opinions on Y and Z are not valid. This is where you have to find more than one SME to look at for information. How do you determine if a prominent figure in the industry is a SME? By comparing their claims to evidence, facts, openness about who/what they are, and if there statements match

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Perspective in training

Photo Courtesy of Norwegian Army By: Tore Haugli They say that the devil is in the details - that is true. However, I sometimes think that there is a lot of useless detail being propogated, as well as focus on problems that really aren't worth the time spent on them. When I was in the military, I was a doer. Still am. I hated meetings and senseless discussions - action is what solves problems, not talk. Decide on a course of action, and follow through. Stop fighting the conditions you are in, and work through it. Better the situation, if you can. As many might have noticed, I am not a big fan of focusing on what we supposedly cannot do "under stress". I instead focus on training hard, or training my guys hard, and using proven techniques. As a soldier in Norway, an arctic climate is one condition that had to be accepted - we cannot change the weather. As such, proper hand wear is not only necessary, but vital for being able to conduct operations. For a few years, recruits would report to basic training in January - I was stationed in the North, with -30*C being the

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“That Guy”: Gearing Up

Know your goal. Know your role. Slow your roll. We live in a world of appearances. It's unavoidable when most of the data we accumulate is visual. How we look is important and can play a large part in what social groups we to which we gain entry. If you show up to your office job in overalls or your mechanic's job in a suit, there's a good chance you won't be taken seriously on first impression. You'll be embarrassed (Damn. There's that word again.). In the fight against the dreaded embarrassment, we emulate.  We find who we want to be like, and we try to look like them. If you're reading this, there's a good chance firearms are a part of your life. We all come to guns from different places. Some of us grew up hunting. Some of us chose a profession for which a gun is a tool (maybe even the primary tool). Some of us came to firearms as historical or collectible. Some of us (I) didn't have any of that. There's a new category of shooter these days. With media, politics and world events constantly sounding the alarm, many of us came to this community

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