Tag Archives: training

Trainers, Training, and Mindset

“The general who wins the battle makes many calculations in his temple before the battle is fought. The general who loses makes but few calculations beforehand.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War This is an ancient piece of wisdom and is true today. But does it apply to the individual citizen or law enforcement officer who just wants to get through the day and make it home to see his or her family in the evening? Absolutely. Mindset is the key to everything. I was fortunate enough to sit in a live conversation broadcast the other night on training and how to select trainers. One of the participants, Varg Freeborn, made a statement about mindset at some point in the chat (most but not all was broadcast and I can’t remember if this was or not) saying mindset is 80% of any fight. He talked about a fight being pretty much won or lost before it even begins based on mindset. That one comment opened my mental file folder of mindset material previously read, taught, presented to students, or written. A good friend and training mentor over the last decade exposed me to mindset when I first began training

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AAR’s for Scenario Based Training: How to and Why

AAR. What is it? After Action Review is the short answer. Why do we do them? Because we have to. Because we’re supposed to. First Sergeant said to. Because I like to hear myself talk. The correct answer should be to give the students (soldiers, cops, whoever) feedback on their performance, to facilitate learning and to make them better. As a young infantryman I hated AARs, I felt like they were just a waste of my time. I would rather be training, or eating, or sleeping, or playing grab ass. These, many moons later, I feel quite differently about it. I honestly think that AARs are only slightly less important than the actual training itself, but only if done correctly. Over the years it has become clear to me that most people simply don’t know how to conduct an AAR. I don’t recall ever being given specific training on how to conduct one. And if you ask me to sit through one like I used to have to endure, I’ll still think it’s a waste of time. An AAR gives the students time to reflect on what happened, what they did, what they did well, and what they could have

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Sucked Down the Tube: A Failure in Training

Much, if not all training and practice is conducted on flat ranges under calm conditions with no surprises. We shoot steel and paper that we purposely place and identify. We have lanes and all sorts of safety considerations that make a day at the range a pleasant experience.  This is fine for most of us but can lead to some critical failures if you are in a line of work that may not look the same as the flat range.  For those that form either the thin Blue or Green Lines targets will probably appear in from unknown positions and ranges. Many people preach situational awareness but fail to account for it in our training. COL Boyd gave us the OODA loop, which on the surface, is a rapidly trainable flow of Observe, Orient, Decide and Act. It is a loop because as soon as you act you start over. Observe. To hit a target, you must first observe it. You could possibly be an intergalactic grand sensei with Generation Next hardware and you will still miss a target you didn’t see. With the proliferation of magnified optics, the tendency of getting sucked down the tube is becoming more prolific

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Inches, Minutes, Clicks- Zero That Blaster

Zeroing is literally one of the most important thing we need to accomplish with our rifles and #spacegun pistols. There is much talk around the technique to accomplish this but there is one way that is easy and fast. First, determine the desired zero distance.  This will vary by rifle, optic, caliber, and most importantly purpose of the firearm. Many people with AR15 rifles use either a 100, 200, or 300 yard/meter zero. Rather, many people claim to use those ranges but most use the near zero distance on either 25 or 50-yard target. Yes, I am talking in yards here because most people on this page are not using meters. Now, to save yourself time, you can use a borelight or something like the Telluric Group Small Arms Collimator. There are lasers available in every price range and should be part of your tool kit. Doing this step will put you at the very least on paper at 25/50 which will save you rounds and frustration. Ask me how I know. Regardless of borelight or not, it’s time to shoot bullets. Get into the most comfortable and stable position possible. One that you can duplicate easily. For you Army

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B.E. Meyers & Co. Inc. Releases MAWL-C1+™ Laser Aiming Device for Commercial Sale

March 7th, 2017 (Redmond, WA) – The Commercial Market Spoke, and We Listened  Since the release of the MAWL-DA™ laser device to the military and law enforcement community in 2016, B.E. Meyers & Co. Inc. has received numerous requests for a civilian legal variant of the MAWL™.  Today we are proud to be able to support these requests by introducing the MAWL-C1+™ commercial laser device.  The C1+ variant is not the typical “Class 1” laser device, and this is the first time that a laser illuminator is available to the shooting community that is not only functional for night target engagement at distance, and exceeds the performance of other commercial systems. MAWL™ Design The MAWL-C1+ has all the sought-after ergonomic design features of the MAWL-DA, allowing for quick operation in the dark and on the move.  In under a second, using only the tip of your thumb, the laser can be manipulated from near to far and back again between short range, mid-range, and long range specific settings.  With low-profile activation buttons centered at just 0.37” above the rail, the MAWL design offers an unparalleled combination of range adjustment and speed of use. Class 1 Plus™ = Irradiance on Target

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A Reminder for Myself and Other Instructors

A lot of times, we take our own repetitions for granted.  As we're teaching, it's easy to become frustrated with students that "just aren't getting it."  And since I'm a nobody, instructor-wise, I get a lot of students that are prone to "just not getting it."  A lot of the top level national guys get students who've trained at a high level before.  And so it's easy to have a line full of switched-on guys that have already built tens of thousands of reps.  We come to those national guys, most of the time, with years if not decades of firearms experience. As a student on their lines, I love that.  We aren't held up by a number of students who are just really slow to pick up some basic concept that we started workin on 20 years ago.  And as a student, it's really easy to get frustrated with "that person" in the class.  You know the one.  The Private Pyles of the class.  We've all seen it.  We've all been frustrated by it. But today, I've had a stark lesson in why we should never let that frustration show, and really, should soften our thinking on it. I

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Running the Irons.

Iron sights have been part of shooting since the very least April 19th 1775. Aiming was a major part of our tactics that helped defeat the British unaimed volley fire. This being said, it should come as no surprise that we have learned, used, and lost uses for iron sights in all environments from jungles, deserts and even the frozen landscapes of Siberia. I am going to talk about a few of those techniques here. First anyone ever wonder why there are 2 apertures on the M16/AR15 platform? Most people have looked and wondered but never cared. Some wondered then tried switching between the two and found no gain from it. There is a reason for it but first we need to talk about sight alignment. Photo courtesy of FMJ Armory, LaGrange, GA TC 3-22.9 states “sight alignment is the relationship between the aiming device and the firer’s eye. To achieve proper and effective aim, the focus of the firer’s eye needs to be on the front sight post or reticle. The Soldier must maintain sight alignment throughout the aiming process.” It goes on to say for iron sights it is the “the relationship between the

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Mr. John Chapman Joins B.E. Meyers & Co. Inc. As Latest MAWL™ Brand Ambassador and Certified Trainer

February, 22nd, 2017 (Redmond, WA) – B.E. Meyers & Co. Inc. is proud to announce that Mr. John Chapman, a.k.a. “Chappy”, is joining the B.E. Meyers Team as our latest Brand Ambassador for the MAWL™ Modular Advanced Weapon Laser system.  This is part of Chappy’s continued law enforcement training efforts while also CEO of Raven Concealment. “I am honored to be joining the B.E. Meyers team”, said Chappy. “The combination of proven designers and engineers working with experienced applications experts has enabled B.E. Meyers to create the MAWL-DA, the most capable multi-function small arms laser system I have used.  I am excited to educate the law enforcement tactical community on the overwhelming benefits of the MAWL™ and B.E. Meyers other signature products for the military and law enforcement community.”   “Chappy brings years of experience to the team, and acts as a conduit for the voice of the customer as we move forward into future products”, said Matt Meyers, President at B.E. Meyers & Co. Inc.  “One of our core goals is to be the most end-user centric photonics company in the industry, and Chappy will undoubtedly be a critical part of that path”.  Chappy joins the current certified MAWL™

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Follow Up on TC 3-22.9

A year ago, we finished the last edits on the TC 3-22.9 that published in May of 2016. For those that have taken the time to read this book, you know it’s very different than the books we have used since the 1970’s.  For those that haven’t, this post will hold less value because you have no context. I just wanted to take a few minutes to post up some responses to issues that have been brought up recently from those that are finally realizing that there is a new Sheriff in town. First off, I want to explain a bit about how books are produced in the US Army. The short version is an NCO or Officer sits at a computer and types the book. From there it goes to paid editors who are SMEs in formatting, word usage, and English. The writer has a graphics team who make bad pictures into awesome things. Then the book is set through several levels of what is called Staffing. Staffing is simply getting the draft into people hands for comments. Usually it starts with stake holders and prior to publishing the draft is sent to “World Wide Staffing” The draft is

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Opportunity Cost

This article begins in 2012, when I joined m4carbine.net.  It seemed to me to be a gathering of solid people giving out solid advice, so I started reading.  From what I have heard since, I really missed out on the heyday of M4C, just like I missed Lightfighter but I digress.  The threads were still there and I did, and still do, learn much from what is written over there.   On many occasions, a newer member would post about purchasing “my first AR,” and was looking for advice on what to buy for it.  The answer, it seemed, was like a broken record: “get some training, and get some ammo.”  In principle I understood, but I too began to be slightly annoyed at the repetition.  “I get it,” I would think, “you are all burning it down with rifles, and you want this guy learning his stuff before buying the gadgets.”  Then I started working on a gun range, later becoming the facility manager.  My eyes were opened, the clouds parted, and the angels sang! The reasons for this oft-repeated phrase became crystal clear. I now want to explain this “get some training, get some ammo” mindset, at least

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