Why I Have A Red Dot On My Pistol – Part 1

Red Dot Sights (RDS) are possibly the single biggest innovation on the pistol platform in recent years. But just like any “new” thing, it has its evangelists and its naysayers. Is it a valuable tool to help you protect you and your loved ones or is it just an expensive accessory to live out your Han Solo fantasy? In the following discussion I will provide some personal insight as to why I feel this is the future of pistols and why you should or should not consider having one. First off, a little background on me….. I am just a regular guy. I am not an LEO or a veteran. I am an NRA certified instructor (but who isn’t these days) and, more importantly, an avid (actually obsessive) researcher of everything self-defense. This obsession has led me to train and compete throughout my life in Martial Arts such as TKD and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. I say this because through my combative arts training in the Metro DC area I have had the pleasure of training with many active/retired military, and LEO (local, state and federal). These friends ignited my passion in firearms and made me realize firearms manipulation is just another

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Scott Jedlinski
Contributor at Primary & Secondary
Lifelong martial artist (TKD, Muay Thai, BJJ), no LEO or military experience (save being an Air Force brat), NRA pistol instructor (who isn’t?). I have received previous training from George Wehby of BlackBelt Tactical, Matt Jacques of Victory First, John Murphy of FPF Training, Chris Sizelove of 1st Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, Aaron Brumley of Solo Defense, Steve Fisher of Sentinel Concepts, Greg Ellifritz of Active Response Training, Pat Goodale and Wayne Fisher of PFT Training, Ernest Langdon for Langdon Tactical and private training with Al DeLeon of the State Dept’s MSD unit. I shoot anywhere from 200 to 400 rounds a week. I try to compete three times a month. I train BJJ 2 to 3 times a week. Strength & Mobility training twice a week. I am the 15th recipient of the F.A.S.T Drill coin.

Just as good as…

No not everyone can build an AR. Stick with a known quantity. Today I had a student who's carbine was experiencing both timing issues and failures to eject (stove pipes) consistently. It was a tell tale over gassed carbine with a weak extractor. I passed him my SBR to let him finish the day and went to work on his carbine. Now to his rifle. The extractor was weeeak. I could fully depress the tail with finger pressure. The claw was sharp so I upgraded the springs, functions checked it, and went to test fire. Bang Bang Bang Choke.... The gun still ejected at 1-130 and eventually the round wouldn't clear the port on the back stroke. The bolt velocity being high, would catch the case head and trap it in the forward edge of the ejection port, with a partially striped live round. I went back to the bench and pulled the buffer. The 16" gun came with a std carbine buffer. I pull it and compare it to a spare H buffer in my kit. His buffer was noticeably lighter, so I installed the H buffer. Test fire. The gun cycled nearly through an entire mag of m855,

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Being Prepared For All Seasons: Through Layer Selection

When dressing before I head out, I like to ask myself, "can I reasonably change a tire, dressed as I am, with the full range of weather and temperatures for today?" From time to time, we must all deal with weather-effects outside of our norm, while still taking on tasks and problems. This may happen with a sudden and unexpected change of the weather, from deficiencies in packing or preparation, or as relates to modern travel options: it is extremely easy for the individual to move across a broad geographic area very quickly; whether by planes, tranes, or automobiles; and thus to encounter quite the variety of conditions. For example: I recently went from a week spent in temperate North Africa, to a few hours in a wintry East Coast city, before I spent a week and a half in northern New England as several snowstorms worked their way through; the net transition time between these three locations was about 12 hours. When unexpected circumstances displaced me without notice, what I had on-hand for contingency positively influenced the outcome. Layering strategies apply at all times of year, and this must include having provision to up-layer. For best effects, we must

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Jules C
Contributor at Primary & Secondary

The Fight Picks You

By: "Frank Woods", NYPD I have something to say. I will try to keep this short and simple. If you are in Law Enforcement and thus have the authority/ability/permission to carry a concealed weapon on your person when in plain clothes off duty, and you don't, you are either lazy, or you have your head up your ass. On at least three occasions in the last two weeks, I have spoken to coworkers of mine that choose not to or otherwise refuse to carry their weapon off duty. Reasons I have been given upon asking why have been: "I live in a safe neighborhood." "It's uncomfortable, there will be uniformed cops around, I haven't needed to carry it off duty." "Our lives are pre-destined and if God wanted for me to carry my weapon off duty on a particular day, then I would feel compelled to do so. What if something happens and I get shot because I have my gun on me and now I've become a target?" I'll tackle these one by one. The first example is naive. Sandy Hook/Newtown was considered a safe neighborhood. Just because things are calm and quiet on the regular, doesn't mean you're not

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Autopsy Of A Rifle: DPMS Oracle 5.56mm

Part 1: Overview This is a factory new DPMS Oracle. And, it's the first rifle featured in our "Autopsy" series. This rifle was unboxed and fired for function. 60 rounds of M193 were fired to test for any obvious issues which would eliminate it as a candidate for this series. This is an objective review, from an armorer's perspective of the components and assembly procedures of this rifle. This is not a knock at DPMS or their fans, but the purpose of Gun Plumbers Inc is to educate shooters on various platforms to help them make the most informed decision when buying a rifle or components. Part 2: Lower receiver. Lower receiver appears to be in-spec and small lower parts are installed correctly and are of the correct materials. Then again, you have to really go out of your way to mess up a detent. This rifle comes with a carbine buffer weight and milspec action spring. We'll come back to this later on. Castle nut is not staked, and receiver extension threads have not been treated with anti-seize. Castle nut broke loose at 22ft/lbs. (38-42ft/lbs is textbook). Coupled with no staking that could be an issue under a heavy course

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Michael Mihalski
Contributor at Primary & Secondary
info@solgw.com

http://sonsoflibertygunworks.com/

AAR: DARC Tactical Urban Sustainment Course (TUSC)

Multiple vehicle drill, contact left and front vehicle is disabled. Moving to the shoot house. AAR: DARC Tactical Urban Sustainment Course (TUSC) 4-7, 20 SEP 2015 By: John D. Remf What this AAR isn't: A complete breakdown of the TTP's and minutia taught in the class. There are reasons for this. The most important is without being there and participating as a team under the eyes of competent instructors, mere words are going to be a disservice. There is a lot more information and experience gained from the course than can be translated into an AAR. What this AAR is: An overview of the scenario, purpose of the class and some lessons learned. The purpose of the Tactical Urban Sustainment Course is an introduction to the problems one would face in the event of a breakdown of order following a catastrophic civil disturbance, either man made or natural. Developing the mindset to find solutions to those problems is emphasized over specific a+b=c mentality. This includes instruction on what to expect when our daily comforts, conveniences, order and security are no longer a reality, and what you can do now, to make that transition more manageable if it becomes necessary. The course

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DIY isn’t always the best option…

  A great example of how poorly understood this platform really is.  This hack job was done by a professional gunsmith. What started out as a solid CHF Centurion 16" carbine barrel...is now an example we will use in an Armorers course. A customer had a 16" barrel with carbine gas system...with an appropriate gas port for that config. This barrel was made by FN, and sold by Centurion (both awesome companies.) The customer took this barrel to a gunsmith to be cut down to an 11.5" barrel. It was cut, recrowned, and threaded beautifully...but it won't run. Why? Because the gunsmith never bothered to open the gas port to compensate for the reduction of dwell time. The customer was frustrated the gun wouldn't run and sought help on the internet...where all the experts live. He was wrongly informed his problem was gas block alignment and was instructed to dimple his barrel...with a hand drill, and no jig. You can see how awesome that turned out...  
Michael Mihalski
Contributor at Primary & Secondary
info@solgw.com

http://sonsoflibertygunworks.com/

What is quality?

  What is quality? According to the American Society of Quality, quality is - 1. the characteristics of a product or service that bear on its ability to satisfy stated or implied needs; 2. a product or service free of deficiencies in“fitness for use;” or in a “conformance to requirements.” You see the problem lies in a consuming public not knowing what really constitutes well made gear. If you have condor gear in any color outside of multicam or ATACS AU and it was purchased between 2012-2013 then chances are it was made with us made MC and Atacs raw fabric out of Duro and Schott Performance. That said, the geometry and methods used to construct their products are substandard at best with frequent deviations from specifications (most noticeably in PALS channel formation) Sometimes the stitch length is as big as 4 stitches per inch on major surfaces up to 6 SPI, when your break strength is about 11lbs per stitch it does count when you start applying a warload. Take a ruler alongside your stitches and see for yourself. .. measure the pals Webbing too, 1.5" on center, 1" gap in between Rarely do you see any reinforcement to

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Darin Talbot
Contributor at Primary & Secondary
Eglabsinfo@gmail.com

http://extremegearlabs.com/

https://www.facebook.com/extremegearlabs

Tactical, cold, wind, rain, survive.

Here are some things to consider regarding layering and desolate areas. The land of many mountains, high desert and high winds can make for a challenging way to manage your body heat while working with tacti-cool gear. The critical issue is to maintain a balance of body core temperature and also minimize perspiration which will accelerate dehydration and also can be an issue with evaporative cooling when you don’t want it to happen. Here is what I use, some of it is commercial mountaineering gear and some is military gear. I mix and match because I don’t always want to look like a barrel chested freedom fighter (Kilimanjaro, Africa) and frankly I like lightweight gear for my wilderness operations- it allows me to move faster. As long as the colors are muted, such as drabs, khakis, grays, etc. I will use it. I made a switch away from polypro and capilene about ten years ago. I have favored merino wool due to its lightweight, non-funk smell and it works in hot and cold weather. I have a variety of merino thin bottoms from Patagonia, Smartwool, Helley Hansen and the like. I prefer thin layers of wool next to my skin

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Lane Critser
Contributor at Primary & Secondary

Police and the minimum requirement

I have always been a firearms enthusiast. I was surprised I wasn’t surrounded by like minded people when I went through the police academy. It wasn’t until I took further training beyond what is provided in law enforcement did I start seeing a bigger picture beyond just firearms. I learned how firearms, equipment, tactics, and training all work in concert. I also found this bigger picture was not an important aspect with many of my coworkers. This bigger picture is an important part of law enforcement; aspects within it can affect life or death outcomes. Originally posted May 21, 2015 The rest is here: http://soldiersystems.net/2015/09/14/matt-landfair-on-police-and-the-minimum-requirement/    
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Matt Landfair
Lead Editor/Contributor at Primary & Secondary
Active Law Enforcement background since before the turn of the century in the middle of no where. Firearms instructor, armorer, hangs out at DARC, has attended numerous training courses including DARC, Follow Through Consulting, EAG, TMacs, and more boring mandatory popo training you can shake a stick at. He has written for RECOIL Magazine, Breach Bang Clear, Soldier Systems Daily and Monderno. Enjoys long walks on the beach, blah blah blah… Known as Matt Prime or Riafdnal in some circles.

Matt@primaryandsecondary.com

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