Category Archives: Everything Else

Just doesn’t fit in the other categories.

Fire Control – Methods

For Training Tuesday, we are continuing our discussion on fire control. Specifically, we will be addressing the various fire control methods. The reference for this discussion is FM 3-22.68, dated July 2006. The difference between these fire control measures and the ones we have been discussed previously is these are fire control measures used at the gun-team level generally. The other measures are used both at the gun team level, and at higher levels. METHODS OF FIRE CONTROL The noise and confusion of battle may limit the use of some of these methods. Therefore, the leader must select a method or combination of methods to accomplish the mission. Oral: The oral fire control method can be effective, but sometimes the leader may be too far away from the gunner, or the noise of the battle may make it impossible for the gunner to hear. The primary means of the oral fire control method is the issuance of a fire command. Arm-and-Hand Signals: Arm-and-hand signals are an effective fire control method when the gunner can see the leader. All gunners must know the standard arm-and-hand signals. The leader gets the gunner's attention and points to the target. When the gunner returns

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Malfunctions with a Primary Weapon, Part 2

For Manual Monday, we are continuing our discussion on Control. Specifically, we will continue our discussion on malfunctions as we address when in the cycle of function immediate action will correct the malfunction, and the rules of correcting a malfunction, which is a specific part of the shot process that was not addressed under the fundamentals. Our reference for this discussion is TC 3-22.9 Change 1, dated January 2017. When a malfunction occurs in combat, the Paratrooper must announce STOPPAGE or another similar term specific to their small unit, quickly move to a covered location, and correct the malfunction as rapidly as possible. If the threat is too close to the Paratrooper or friendly forces, and the Paratrooper has a secondary weapon, they should immediately transition to secondary to defeat the target prior to correcting the malfunction. The following are the rules for clearing any malfunction. The rules mentioned are the four rules of firearms safety every Paratrooper must know and follow. To clear a malfunction, the Paratrooper must— Apply Rule #1. Paratroopers must remain coherent of their weapon and continue to treat their weapon as if it is loaded when correcting malfunctions. Apply Rule #2. Paratroopers must ensure the

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Five on Friday 4-17

This is a weekly feature blog post composed of a selection of items from around the web that I read this week; five links and a cool Instagram photo to grab attention. It's not all firearms or duty related. Some items are current events, some are industry news, some are technology. It's going to be all over the place with the only central theme being that I read it some time this week and found it interesting.
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Malfunctions with the Primary Weapon

After a long hiatus due to setting up the 82nd Airborne Division Enduring range, we are back to regular posts. We are continuing our discussion on Control. Specifically, we will continue our discussion on malfunctions as we address when in the cycle of function immediate action will correct the malfunction, and the rules of correcting a malfunction, which is a specific part of the shot process that was not addressed under the fundamentals. Our reference for this discussion is TC 3-22.9 Change 1, dated January 2017. To overcome the malfunction, the Paratrooper must first avoid over analyzing the issue. The Soldier must train to execute corrective actions immediately without hesitation or investigation during combat conditions. There are two general types of corrective action, they are: Immediate action – simple, rapid actions or motions taken by the Soldier to correct basic disruptions in the cycle of function of the weapon. Immediate action is taken when a malfunction occurs such that the trigger is squeezed and the hammer falls with an audible “click.” Remedial action – a skilled, technique that must be applied to a specific problem or issue with the weapon that will not be corrected by taking immediate action. Remedial

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Five on Friday 3-17

This is a weekly feature blog post composed of a selection of items from around the web that I read this week; five links and a cool Instagram photo to grab attention. It's not all firearms or duty related. Some items are current events, some are industry news, some are technology. It's going to be all over the place with the only central theme being that I read it some time this week and found it interesting.
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Five on Friday 2-17

This is a weekly feature blog post composed of a selection of items from around the web that I read this week; five links and a cool Instagram photo to grab attention. It's not all firearms or duty related. Some items are current events, some are industry news, some are technology. It's going to be all over the place with the only central theme being that I read it some time this week and found it interesting.
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Five on Friday 1-17

This is a weekly feature blog post composed of a selection of items from around the web that I read this week; five links and a cool Instagram photo to grab attention. It's not all firearms or duty related. Some items are current events, some are industry news, some are technology. It's going to be all over the place with the only central theme being that I read it some time this week and found it interesting.
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Running the Irons.

Iron sights have been part of shooting since the very least April 19th 1775. Aiming was a major part of our tactics that helped defeat the British unaimed volley fire. This being said, it should come as no surprise that we have learned, used, and lost uses for iron sights in all environments from jungles, deserts and even the frozen landscapes of Siberia. I am going to talk about a few of those techniques here. First anyone ever wonder why there are 2 apertures on the M16/AR15 platform? Most people have looked and wondered but never cared. Some wondered then tried switching between the two and found no gain from it. There is a reason for it but first we need to talk about sight alignment. Photo courtesy of FMJ Armory, LaGrange, GA TC 3-22.9 states “sight alignment is the relationship between the aiming device and the firer’s eye. To achieve proper and effective aim, the focus of the firer’s eye needs to be on the front sight post or reticle. The Soldier must maintain sight alignment throughout the aiming process.” It goes on to say for iron sights it is the “the relationship between the

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Inforce WMLxIR review

I recently purchased a WMLxIR for use on a training/duty rifle. The rifle is used primarily for low light and night vision training. Having learned the hard way how difficult it is to operate under NVGS without proper IR illumination I was very excited to see a recently released and updated WMLxIR with better white light output. During a previous Night Vision course I had the opportunity to try a different generation of the WML IR and was impressed with the IR illumination especially for use in close quarters. The light seemed like it was the perfect balance of white light output and IR illum… There were, however, several glaring issues that made themselves crystal clear with actual implementation: First and perhaps the biggest issue is with the switch. Although the entire back of the light is theoretically the switch the reality is that to effectively activate the light you have to hit an impossibly small and off center part of the pad. The actual switch is a tactilely imperceptible nub under the rubberized pad that felt like it needed to be pushed in at exactly the right angle or it wouldn’t function. I moved the light no less than

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Vehicle Loadouts

Vehicle Loadout – carrying stuff out of sight, out of mind. Frame of reference: Carried this way when I lived in a small town in a Western “Cowboy” “pro gun” area. *When I travel to less “pro gun” or “Cowboy” regions into a more “Hippie” region, I cover up my gun stuff with less gun/tactical looking stuff or conceal it in “hippieflauge” backpacks all together.* Mission: Bring fighting sustainment kit such as ammo, mag bags, armor, long guns as well as medical for Gunshot and Trauma as well as basic 1st Aid supplies. Broken further down into what stays in my vehicle vs what gets brought in/out and when in a borrowed/rental ride. The stuff we leave in our car is going to be dictated by environmental concerns/knowing where you live/travel. Living in the desert for the last 7 years I have learned that water is life. As towns can be 1 hour to 1.5 hours apart at speed on the interstate, you have to keep water with you. As water gets nasty when left in the hot car for a while, I have found its better to just travel with extra fresh water all the time – 2-3 32oz

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