Category Archives: Equipment

Gear & Equipment (Stuff that helps us accomplish the mission)

Thermal Boresighting

We are continuing our discussion on the Boresight. Specifically, we will be boresighting thermals. The reference for this is TM 9-5860-226-13&P dated August 2007. The boresight needs to be zeroed to the weapon prior to zeroing anything else. To learn how to zero the Laser Boresight, and why it is important to do this, reference the TTP article post prior. Thermals are handled slightly differently than the primary optic for the weapon. To set up the weapon for thermals, you will get in as stable a platform as possible. Once that has been accomplished, you will then have to give the Paratrooper on the weapon a refined point of aim to see the aim point with. If I were to just use a sheet of paper, there would be nothing there to indicate to the paratrooper where the point of aim is. To give them a refined point of aim, the Paratrooper at the Target holds their fingers on the two ovals flanking the aim point on the offset target.  Two people are required for this: the Paratrooper on the weapon, the Paratrooper Making adjustments on the thermal, and the Paratrooper at the target. The process starts by the Paratrooper on

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Medical kits review: From the uniform LE perspective

The following review comes from the perspective of daily uniform wear for law enforcement. This is not intended to be a comprehensive review of all available offerings rather a review of those kits I have used over the years and their general performance and attributes. This is not meant to be a discussion of medical training or proper implementation. I’ll begin with a list of the products I’ll be reviewing so that you can easily skip ahead: Chinook Medical - Officer Response Pouch Dark Angel Medical – DARK lite trauma kit Blue Force Gear – Micro Trauma kit Original SOE Gear – Tear off IFAK First Spear – Self aid pocket and insert *I will use “Tourniquet” and “TQ” interchangeably *NPA = Nasopharyngeal airway aka nose hose * I did not get into the weeds with the cost of each med kits’ contents as this isn’t really the focus of my article and not all of my kits are setup the same. The mentions of price in my analysis are related to my interpretation of those costs relative to the capability of the kit. Chinook Medical – Officer Response Pouch http://www.chinookmed.com/cgi-bin/item/01151/c-law/-Officer-Response-Pouch-%28LEMK-OR%29 The ORP is the pouch I am currently using

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Low Power Variable Optics

We will be discussing optics, and what trends there are in the civilian market that may carry over to the military force modernization efforts. One of the biggest trends in the optics market for firearms the past few years has been in Low-Power Variable Optics. For the Definition of this discussion, a low-power variable optic is a scope that is a 1-6 or 1-8 power scope, that has very little parallax. A Low Power Variable optic, such as the Leupold Mk VI 1-6 gives the Paratrooper the capability of engagements from near to far. For day-to-day use, the optic is left on 1x, and as needed, the Paratrooper can dial up the magnification to be able to reach out and engage targets more efficiently. Moreover, there has been improvements in reticle technology. We now have reticles available similar to the one presented in the above picture, that allow the Paratrooper to apply a more precise hold for both wind calls and moving targets. A simplified ‘christmas tree,’ like in picture two, makes it possible for consistent shot placement. When you couple this reticle with a first focal plane scope, it makes the reticle change scale based off the magnification selected.

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Even More On Boresighting

We are continuing our discussion on the Boresight. Specifically, we will be boresighting lasers. The reference for this is TM 9-5860-226-13&P dated August 2007. The boresight needs to be zeroed to the weapon prior to zeroing anything else. To learn how to zero the Laser Boresight, and why it is important to do this, reference the TTP Thursday post from last week. Lasers are handled differently than the primary optic for the weapon. To set up the weapon for lasers, you will place the weapon in as stable a platform as possible with the boresight on its point on the offset. The Paratrooper does not need to hold the weapon, a gun vice or shadowbox will work. Once that has been accomplished, you will then use the adjusters on the laser to adjust to the point on the target for the IR aiming laser. Always use the IR aiming laser, not the visible aiming laser. The IR is the primary laser you will use in combat, and even though they share the same optical bench, you want to zero the primary laser to the weapon. The Paratrooper does not need to be behind the weapon at this point, as there

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Mr. John Chapman Joins B.E. Meyers & Co. Inc. As Latest MAWL™ Brand Ambassador and Certified Trainer

February, 22nd, 2017 (Redmond, WA) – B.E. Meyers & Co. Inc. is proud to announce that Mr. John Chapman, a.k.a. “Chappy”, is joining the B.E. Meyers Team as our latest Brand Ambassador for the MAWL™ Modular Advanced Weapon Laser system.  This is part of Chappy’s continued law enforcement training efforts while also CEO of Raven Concealment. “I am honored to be joining the B.E. Meyers team”, said Chappy. “The combination of proven designers and engineers working with experienced applications experts has enabled B.E. Meyers to create the MAWL-DA, the most capable multi-function small arms laser system I have used.  I am excited to educate the law enforcement tactical community on the overwhelming benefits of the MAWL™ and B.E. Meyers other signature products for the military and law enforcement community.”   “Chappy brings years of experience to the team, and acts as a conduit for the voice of the customer as we move forward into future products”, said Matt Meyers, President at B.E. Meyers & Co. Inc.  “One of our core goals is to be the most end-user centric photonics company in the industry, and Chappy will undoubtedly be a critical part of that path”.  Chappy joins the current certified MAWL™

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Aimpoint RDS and Pistol Mounting PSA

Aimpoint RDS and Pistol mounting PSA Last year I finally got into the RDS equipped Glock game, using a ALG Defense 6 Second Mount on a Gen 4 Glock 22. About 100 rounds into learning the gun, the dot disappeared. I contacted Aimpoint, and they took care of replacing the pre 2009 well used and abused 4 MOA T-1 with a new 2 MOA T1. In the meantime I used another pre 2009 used and abused 4 MOA T-1 on that gun. It had no issues in the mean time.   A couple months ago, I received a testing model of the Raven Concealment Balor optic mount. I took the used 4 MOA T-1 and put it on the Balor and then mounted it on the Gen 4 Glock 22. About 200 rounds into it, well dot/dial broke. Again, I contacted Aimpoint. Aimpoint rapidly took care of warranty work on this, but more importantly for those interested in a Aimpoint RDS on a Glock, I received the following advice. While there is no proof that the Aimpoint T-1 family is being killed on pistols, there have been more than one optic killed when mounted to a pistol. While researching that,

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More Zeroing With Boresight

We are going to continue our discussion on the Laser Boresight. Specifically, we are going to talk about how to zero the enabler with a zeroed LBS. The reference for this is TM 9-5860-226-13&P dated August 2007. To learn how to zero the Laser Boresight, and why it is important to do this, reference the TTP Thursday post from last week. Now that we have established a good solid zero for the boresight, the next task we will conduct will be zeroing the weapon. To do that, we start with as solid a position as possible. There are three people involved in this process: the Weapon man making corrections to the optic, the Target man who has secured the appropriate offset to the wall, and the Paratrooper whose weapon is being zeroed. The Paratrooper assumes a very stable position. The prone supported with a sand sock if possible is ideal. Bench rests or a gun vise are an excellent method of securing the weapon as well. The Paratrooper acquires their sight picture with their optic, and as soon as their dot is on the dot at the center of the target, they call out ‘mark.’ The Target man looks at

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Bawidamann Denlinger OWB Mag Pouch

After seeing a Soldier Systems Daily article about the Bawidamann holster now called the Gotham, I wanted to look into further into the holster. So I bought one. I was already familiar with Bawidamann horizontal mag pouches and their blades by reputation - that reputation being quite good.  Long backstory short, the holster is outstanding. Excellent passive retention, nicely finished, very well constructed, very comfortable, sturdy. This is coming from someone who has been wearing weapons appendix for a number of years, so comfort is relative. Mid January I acquired a small selection of Bawidamann mag pouches: the already well known horizontal Uber CC for standard Glock mags as well and a newer Uber CC for a G43, and the vertical Denlinger for my 9mm double stack Glocks and  one for my G43. Similarly crafted to the Gotham, the finely made Denlinger is a low profile OWB streamlined single mag pouch. The pouch affixes to your belt via a flexible strip that is permanently attached to the bottom with screws and heavy rubber washers and the top has a one way snap. This pouch does have a smaller footprint compared to other similar pouches due to needing only one belt attachment

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Dressing for Winter – Gloves

By: Orvar Bäcklin “There’s no such thing as bad weather, only bad clothing” -Swedish Proverb This is a follow-up to the cold weather primer I wrote. If you haven’t seen it, I highly recommend starting there. The idea here is to try and produce a series of articles detailing my experiences with how to best equip yourself for dealing with extended operations in sub-arctic or just really cold environments. This first piece will go over taking care of the most important tools you have – your hands. A typical glove setup for field ops for me consists of 3-4 different gloves. I'll have a lightly or non-insulated work glove, a thin wool liner, a heavier five finger glove and mittens. Your hands, much like your feet, sweat and freeze fairly simple. I try to eliminate as much glove-less time as I possibly can for that reason. Classic military or outdoors problems are handling metal objects such as your thermos, stove, weapon, radios etc, most requiring some form of dexterity to maneuver. By using a thin liner glove I can take of my heavier gloves while still maintaining a shield between my fingers and whatever metal surface I just have to touch,

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How To Zero The Laser Boresight To A Weapon

We're going to do a talk through on how to zero the laser boresight to a weapon. If you have any questions on what this piece of kit is, and why it is important, check our TTP post from before. The Laser Boresight can be used with regular 5.56mm, 7.62mm, and .50 caliber weapons, sniper weapons are excluded due to the nature of the rifling of their barrels. This system is unique compared to bullet-type lasers, in that it is zeroed to the individual weapon's barrel. This means that you get closer to the true line of bore for that weapon. To zero it, you will first select and screw in the appropriate mandrel by hand. Do not tool tighten the mandrel, as it will crack the nut loose from its polymer case, and then you have an LBS paperweight. You will then place it in the barrel of the weapon until the mandrel is snug against the crown of the barrel. Then you will ensure the weapon itself is stable. A rock-solid bench-rest type of position is preferred for the weapon, so that the soldier need not hold it at this point. Once that is complete, you will begin

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