Tag Archives: Primaryandsecondary

Follow Up on TC 3-22.9

A year ago, we finished the last edits on the TC 3-22.9 that published in May of 2016. For those that have taken the time to read this book, you know it’s very different than the books we have used since the 1970’s.  For those that haven’t, this post will hold less value because you have no context. I just wanted to take a few minutes to post up some responses to issues that have been brought up recently from those that are finally realizing that there is a new Sheriff in town. First off, I want to explain a bit about how books are produced in the US Army. The short version is an NCO or Officer sits at a computer and types the book. From there it goes to paid editors who are SMEs in formatting, word usage, and English. The writer has a graphics team who make bad pictures into awesome things. Then the book is set through several levels of what is called Staffing. Staffing is simply getting the draft into people hands for comments. Usually it starts with stake holders and prior to publishing the draft is sent to “World Wide Staffing” The draft is

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The Do Everything Carbine

We see rifles set up for Close Quarte Battle (CQB), Designated Marksman (DM), Special Purpose Rifle (SPR), General Purpose (GP) and a myriad of other acronyms. While I fully support building of fine firearms, I just wanted to talk about a Do Everything carbine. First off, we must look at our application of the rifle. That’s the first thing we should determine prior to the build. Just like with cars, somethings are very specific and hinder other roles. The AR platform can literally be adapted to any role and is only limited by caliber. That limit is based on application as well. So here are some basic questions to ask when planning a build. What do I want it to do? What will I be doing the most? What is my skillset? What ranges will I be using it at the most? What type of shooting will I be doing? What is the budget?   Once you have some of these answers you can start planning the build. In days of old some things that were “facts” helped lead us in a direction. We thought that for accuracy at 600 yards we needed 18-20 inches of barrel hence the SPR.

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Leading Fighting Men

This is one man's musings, and over the course of my career they are things that I wanted from my leaders. As such, I have tried hard to be that guy as a current leader. This is meant for discussion, not as a how to guide. One of my greatest strengths as a leader is that I recognize how big of a failure I have been as one. Waxing poetic about leadership traits does not make you a leader. Indeed, the one true test, and really the only one that matters to me, is whether the men think I'm doing a good job as a leader. My team "votes" for team leaders, this doesn't mean that Chiefs couldn't over ride the vote, they can, but that has never happened since we started handing out 3X5 cards and asking dudes to write down the four names they want running an operation on the worst day, in the worst possible circumstances. I take great pride that the men have written my name down, not just once, but on every vote. Unanimously on the last one. And I assure you that this is not a popularity contest, these dudes get it and want

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P&S Final Assessment SOLGW Carbine With Matt Shockey

https://youtu.be/tpl1rn4Zh0A Matt Shockey provides his final thoughts about the Sons Of Liberty Gun Works review conducted for Primary & Secondary. https://sonsoflibertygunworks.com/  
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Low Ready / High Ready Again

I recently read an article that was espousing the benefits of high ready over low ready. Within the article the author stated that one explanation for high ready is that you’re automatically in a position to muzzle strike or be able to run faster. Both of which he stated were true. On the muzzle strike issue I would say he is right. As a cop my department policies dictate some of what I can and cannot do. Muzzle strikes to the head and neck region would be considered deadly force by my policy. It falls in the same category as a wood shampoo, I can do it but deadly force criteria must be met. Conversely, throwing elbows to the dome are not, and I would argue that I can throw a nastier elbow with my rifle at low ready versus high ready. I don’t have one of those sweet ass pressure plates that Drago was punching in Rocky IV to test it, but I can subjectively tell you that there is a huge difference in heavy bag response trying it from both positions. On to the point at hand of this; does high ready really let me run faster? I

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P&S Glassware Now Available From AT Armor!

You have been waiting for a reason to finally place that order with AT Armor. The basket on the AT Armor web store has items waiting for checkout. Those plates, that plate carrier, and those AT Armor shirts are waiting for you in limbo. Now is the time to place that order. A very limited quantity of the P&S Brown Water Glass and the P&S Pint Glass are now available. More will be ordered depending on demand. These are only available only through AT Armor. All net proceeds go to operating costs of the Primary & Secondary Network. Fight!
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The Basics of Hosting a Training Class

By Adam Syfrett Many people entertain the idea of playing host to a professional instructor, in the hopes of potentially mitigating some of their own personal logistical hurdles that would be involved in travelling to seek training. Others seek to do it just for the free spot in class. If these are your only motivations for being a host, I invite you to reconsider your train of thought. Playing host to a class places logistical and organizational demands on you far and away above attending one. That is not to say that the juice is not worth the squeeze. Having played host now to several instructors, I’ve greatly increased my own scope of knowledge, and circle of friends. The most obvious need for playing host is some sort of range facility. The facilities you have access to will play a critical role in the sort of classes you can host. Talk to the range owner/board, and see what sort of classes they are comfortable having their name associated with as well. If a certain class you want to host has something as a part of its plan of instruction (POI) that is against range rules-such as drawing from concealment, or

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Fun With Shockey At DARC Part 2

Day 2 of the course is a lot like the first night, except it’s not. They add more to your plate, namely the Porno. Unfortunately, that’s where my explanation of the Porno ends and you’ll just have to taste the rainbow for yourself when you attend. There is no free lunch in this course, but Rich also doesn’t put you in “no win” situations. Use the tactics correctly and things go pretty well, fall apart and you pay for it. It’s actually pretty simple. Following chronological order, Day 3 is next. This is where shit gets real interesting. You start to become comfortable, almost to the point of overly confident, at which point Rich introduces a reality check. It’s humbling and carries a great amount of learning points. You really begin to learn the importance of team work and utilizing the “system”. Furthermore, you learn that you have to look out for the team and not yourself. No bullshit, you can have a multi-cell team going in and if one dude fucks up, it can cause the team to fall apart……and when you fall apart, pain follows. Day 4 is next….I know, you’re surprised a Marine could count to 4,

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Fun With Shockey At DARC Part 1

 DARC LECTC LEVEL 1 Why you should shut the fuck up and attend if you carry a gun for a living….  Prelude So if you’re looking for a tell all AAR on DARC LECTC so you can come prepared, you’re not gonna find it here. This AAR in some aspects is going to be vague, on purpose, because there are many aspects of this course that need to be left out and be a mystery to you. The reason for this is because there are many surprises in the course that serve as learning points and would lose its training value if you knew what was up ahead. I’m going to share my experience while at DARC and also try to explain why you shouldn’t want to go to this course, but rather NEED to go to this course if you do professional level shit for a living. I will say, this course is more geared to the LE SWAT Officer, but regular street level non-tactical knuckle draggers could benefit greatly from this course. Also, Im a spazmatic ADHD mofo, so if I stray off on to rabbit trails or rapidly change thoughts, blame it on that. Lastly, I only

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Professionalism In Posting Within Social Media

By Phil Combs Unless this is your first encounter with Primary & Secondary, you’ll have more than likely noticed mention of ‘dis-information’ in today’s world of social media. In similar fashion has been a ‘Lack of details’ in posts as well as responding comments. The end result, more often than not, is a very to the point and informative comment thread muddied with more questions. The goal of this article is to provide a ‘guideline’ to better posting. Being vague provides little direction and subsequently leave readers either speculating or asking unnecessary questions. This particular post got very little response due to the lack of direction the poster gave. These types of posts usually end up being a runaway train of overwhelming and widely varying opinions with little usable or quality advice.     Here is a comment response making recommendations based off of feelings rather than specifics such as degree of use, time frame of the round count, etc. This is not very helpful in gauging whether a brand is up to the task of serious possibly lifesaving use.     Being as specific as possible is not only easier to follow, but gives a clearly defined direction for

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