Unofficial Official B8 Bullseye Thread

David Mayeur

Regular Member
Network Support I
#1
The NRA B8 is hated more than it is loved, but appreciated nonetheless. It has become the gold standard for precision pistol shooting at distance.

Everyone likes to show off their abilities, so it's time we have our own bullseye thread.

I'll start it off by submitting a humble 91 and upsetting 89.

 
#4
This past Saturday, if you count the line break it's the closest I have gotten to a perfect 100...

STI Staccato P with an RMR 3.25, S&B 124 grain NATO, 10 rounds at 25 yards.

IMG_2980-1.jpg



Also, decided to reach out to 50 yards.

STI Staccato P with an RMR 3.25, 147 grain American Eagle, 20 rounds at 50 yards.

IMG_2896.jpg
 

JBowles

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Network Support I
#5
If you want to get your 50yrd bulleye shooter game one you should be using B-6 Targets.

Also you can get real B-8 repair centers for about the cost of of a half around of cheap 9mm, just sayin...

also also

 
Last edited:

user12358

Regular Member
#7
If you want to get your 50yrd bulleye shooter game one you should be using B-6 Targets.

Also you can get real B-8 repair centers for about the cost of of a half around of cheap 9mm, just sayin...
The B-6 rings are identically sized as David said. The B-8 repair centers can be had for 6 cents on the thinner paper but are still 6 cents more than free office/hotel printer paper.
 
#10
I hope this is an appropriate place to put this post. I've been shooting for several years but almost all of my target practice has been at 10 yards or less and when I did shoot further it would be usually at full silhouette steel (or when a local match forced me to do it). I started trying to get more serious about shooting about a year ago. I decided to start trying my hand at some longer range shooting. Due to some limitations of where I often shoot I started trying my hand at shooting at a bowling pin at roughly 40 yards. I quickly became discouraged because I was hitting the pin, on average, 2 or 3 times for every 20 rounds fired. After listening to Pressburg, et al. I decided to try my hand at 25 yard b8s for the first time a few months ago. My first attempt I got 3 rounds (of 10) on paper for a score of 22. I tried again and again and the best I could pull off was a 25, and I even had a 14 at one point. I was dismayed but had no idea what I was doing wrong. I thought my fundamentals were good and didn't know how to diagnose my problems. I tried a few more times each time with equally dismal results. I tried Glocks, a Beretta 92, a Sig 2022, a 1911, and even my Shield with no improvement. Then a friend lent me his Glock 19 upper milled for an RMR (3.25 dot) and on a whim I shot b8s with that. I immediately went to getting all 10 shots on paper and scoring in the mid 80s. I know that that's not particularly good but it's a huge improvement for me. I did it like 5 times in a row. Firing at the same pace with a gun that was completely stock other than the RMR. Then I switched back to irons and my score was back down in the 20s again. This suggests to me that my issue is one of sight alignment/picture and not trigger control, grip, etc. What I can't figure out is how to fix it and what I'm doing wrong. I can score 80+ on a b8 at 15 yards with irons, and I can shoot stuff like dot torture pretty well. So what am I doing wrong that makes such a huge difference at 25? Sorry for hijacking your thread with my dissertation, but any help would be appreciated.
 

JLL2013

Regular Member
#12
What iron sights do you have on your pistol? I'm willing to be they aren't zeroed and are big fatties (tritium etc). If you put some Dawson adjustables with a nice thing front sight and no distracting art on the rear your scores will improve. However, you're not wrong about the accuracy advantage of a red dot. The red dot is giving you feedback (you can clearly see your wobble zone) and letting you see the whole target.


I hope this is an appropriate place to put this post. I've been shooting for several years but almost all of my target practice has been at 10 yards or less and when I did shoot further it would be usually at full silhouette steel (or when a local match forced me to do it). I started trying to get more serious about shooting about a year ago. I decided to start trying my hand at some longer range shooting. Due to some limitations of where I often shoot I started trying my hand at shooting at a bowling pin at roughly 40 yards. I quickly became discouraged because I was hitting the pin, on average, 2 or 3 times for every 20 rounds fired. After listening to Pressburg, et al. I decided to try my hand at 25 yard b8s for the first time a few months ago. My first attempt I got 3 rounds (of 10) on paper for a score of 22. I tried again and again and the best I could pull off was a 25, and I even had a 14 at one point. I was dismayed but had no idea what I was doing wrong. I thought my fundamentals were good and didn't know how to diagnose my problems. I tried a few more times each time with equally dismal results. I tried Glocks, a Beretta 92, a Sig 2022, a 1911, and even my Shield with no improvement. Then a friend lent me his Glock 19 upper milled for an RMR (3.25 dot) and on a whim I shot b8s with that. I immediately went to getting all 10 shots on paper and scoring in the mid 80s. I know that that's not particularly good but it's a huge improvement for me. I did it like 5 times in a row. Firing at the same pace with a gun that was completely stock other than the RMR. Then I switched back to irons and my score was back down in the 20s again. This suggests to me that my issue is one of sight alignment/picture and not trigger control, grip, etc. What I can't figure out is how to fix it and what I'm doing wrong. I can score 80+ on a b8 at 15 yards with irons, and I can shoot stuff like dot torture pretty well. So what am I doing wrong that makes such a huge difference at 25? Sorry for hijacking your thread with my dissertation, but any help would be appreciated.
 

Sunshine_Shooter

Established
Network Support I
#13
I hope this is an appropriate place to put this post. I've been shooting for several years but almost all of my target practice has been at 10 yards or less and when I did shoot further it would be usually at full silhouette steel (or when a local match forced me to do it). I started trying to get more serious about shooting about a year ago. I decided to start trying my hand at some longer range shooting. Due to some limitations of where I often shoot I started trying my hand at shooting at a bowling pin at roughly 40 yards. I quickly became discouraged because I was hitting the pin, on average, 2 or 3 times for every 20 rounds fired. After listening to Pressburg, et al. I decided to try my hand at 25 yard b8s for the first time a few months ago. My first attempt I got 3 rounds (of 10) on paper for a score of 22. I tried again and again and the best I could pull off was a 25, and I even had a 14 at one point. I was dismayed but had no idea what I was doing wrong. I thought my fundamentals were good and didn't know how to diagnose my problems. I tried a few more times each time with equally dismal results. I tried Glocks, a Beretta 92, a Sig 2022, a 1911, and even my Shield with no improvement. Then a friend lent me his Glock 19 upper milled for an RMR (3.25 dot) and on a whim I shot b8s with that. I immediately went to getting all 10 shots on paper and scoring in the mid 80s. I know that that's not particularly good but it's a huge improvement for me. I did it like 5 times in a row. Firing at the same pace with a gun that was completely stock other than the RMR. Then I switched back to irons and my score was back down in the 20s again. This suggests to me that my issue is one of sight alignment/picture and not trigger control, grip, etc. What I can't figure out is how to fix it and what I'm doing wrong. I can score 80+ on a b8 at 15 yards with irons, and I can shoot stuff like dot torture pretty well. So what am I doing wrong that makes such a huge difference at 25? Sorry for hijacking your thread with my dissertation, but any help would be appreciated.
It sounds like your issue is that you aren't shooting a red dot. Put a dot on your gun and go from there.
 

David Mayeur

Regular Member
Network Support I
#14
It sounds like your issue is that you aren't shooting a red dot. Put a dot on your gun and go from there.
Ash Hess has made comments about the benefits of a RMR being that the information you're getting from being target focused with a crisp dot allows you to be less concerned with sight picture and focus on other important things such as grip and trigger press. I'm not saying it's an end all be all fix, but if you have issues with irons at distance, it's worth looking into.
 
#17
Only ones I have pictures of, sighted in the new rmr. Unfortunately the indoor range only went to 15 yards (I know I know). Bottom group was 115 grain range ammo, upper right was 124 +p Gold Dot, upper right hand was just a 5 yard for fun