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Training

Ideas & Concepts,

Thoughts on Fighting rifles

What makes a Great fighting rifle? Is it just reliability and the ever-present internet “MILSPEC” assembly and parts or is there something more?I have spent the better part of my adult life focused on fighting with a gun and over six years directly involved with how to use them effectively. During this time, I have… read more »

Systems Thinking and the Shot Process: Why the ‘Fundamentals’ Don’t Work

Recently, I’ve been exposed to Peter Senge’s ‘The Fifth Discipline; the Art of the Learning Organization. Senge (2013) asserted that there are two types of complexity: dynamic and detail (p.71). Before 2015, the United States Army had been using detail complexity to help explain what is a dynamically complex task: Firing a weapon in combat. Headquarters, Department of… read more »

Gunslingin’ #6

This is part deux of The Shot Process. Check out Gunslingin’ #5 for part 1 A shot process can be as simple or as detailed as you need it to be. That is determined by target size, target distance and shooters capability.Hits on a man-sized target up close can have a process of trigger, trigger,trigger…. read more »

Gunslingin’ #5

If you haven’t been keeping up, I have done articles on Stability, aiming, and data. Those articles lead back to the first one and the shot process. For this one, I am going to focus on that and the “why” to use it in your own shooting and getting it into your training. This will… read more »

Something About Shooting in the Dark

Up front I need to let you know that this isn’t going to be another article on how to hold your flashlight. There are probably around three thousand of those already. This article is a direct result of the shenanigans I see on the range when the sun goes down. This quarter is our annual… read more »

Gunslingin #4

If you have been keeping up with the series, you know that we have talked positions and data. Now its time to talk about the spot where a ton of mistakes, plus failures in position and data cost time and money. The average match round for 5.56 is about $1 and in the PRS series… read more »

Gunslingin’ #3

For this installment, I am going to talk about data. Now, I am not, nor ever claimed to be, one of the Sniper types. I am sure by the end of this some Sniper Steve will be sitting around going “Actually…” which is fine. This is a short version of how I obtained and confirmed… read more »

Bad reps don’t count

W​hen I first started shooting, I was obsessed with my round count. I knew that the top pro shooters shot tens of thousands of rounds each year in training and competition, and I believed that shooting that kind of volume would get me to that level. It did work a little. From 2011-2013 I shot… read more »

Communication Confusion

One of the most neglected aspects in Close Quarter Combat (CQB) training is communications. What I mean by this is- How to correctly pass information so that the team may react with speed and decisiveness, in an appropriate manner. The reason why communications is so neglected is it is usually last in the priority of… read more »

Turning Corners, What’s the Rush?

My first military CQB (Close Quarters Battle) training experience was not actually in a room or building, but instead in a trench. Back in 1990 (yes, I am old) my infantry unit spent a lot of time clearing trenches in preparation for the 1991 Gulf War. It was during this training we were taught the… read more »

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