Category Archives: Training

Forge Tactical

26 April 2017 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Alliance, Ohio John Chapman and John Spears, senior cadre members at EAG Tactical, announced today the formation of Forge Tactical, a gunfighting training firm focused on supporting the mission of our nation’s armed citizens, law enforcement officers and military professionals, carrying the legacy of EAG Tactical into the future. “I am excited we were able to create a mechanism to carry on the EAG legacy while evolving our instructional and consulting capabilities,” said John Chapman, Director and Instructor at Forge Tactical. “The responsibility that comes with teaching fighting is one which we take seriously. John and I are focused on providing the same high level of principals and standards based training our students have come to expect, while also breaking new ground in the integration of skills, techniques and procedures courses in commercially available tactical training.” John Spears, Director and Instructor at Forge Tactical emphasized, “While we have always enjoyed and continue to teach weapons skills and manipulation classes our focus has always been the next stage of development; assembling skills into procedures. This is how we help students and agencies realize capabilities that allow mission completion. Inherent in this is the emphasis on

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Skill Drills vs. Scenario Training

I was inspired to write this article because of a curious phenomenon known as the Dunning-Kruger Effect. This describes how a person’s knowledge of a subject and their self-perceived expertise are inversely proportional. So a person with very little knowledge of a subject often think that they know much more about a subject than they actually do. And a true expert often believes that what s/he knows is common knowledge. This is seen in a medical community with people who self-diagnose based off a five minute search on Web MD and then argue with actual medical professionals when care is sought. This is also seen in the firearms community all the time. Joe Anybody hears something at the gun shop, or reads something on an internet forum or FaceBook page. Joe Anybody then proclaims his new found truth for all to hear. He even corrects those who have much more experience and knowledge because Joe doesn’t know what he doesn’t know and in his mind he is an expert. On the other end I’ve had numerous Special Forces soldiers tell me “If I can do it anyone can.” I appreciate the humility, but you only have to look as far

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Integrated Weapons Training Strategy Doctrine

For Walkthrough Wednesday, we are continuing the discussion on the Integrated Weapons Training Strategy and the changes that are going to be taking place in doctrine. Master Jhoon Rhee, considered the father of American Tae-kwon-do, is cited with saying: “Discipline is the habit of taking consistent action until one can perform with unconscious competence. Discipline weighs ounces but regret weighs tons.” This ties into our discussion on the IWTS in that units have not taken consistent action to get to the level of true weapons mastery, which is unconscious competence. Mostly, it has come from the fact that there truly was not a coherent strategy across all platforms to develop unconscious competence in our weapons. The Maneuver Center of Excellence in the process of revising the doctrine that we are using. This means all weapons doctrine (Individual, Crew-Served, and Special Purpose) will be being updated to reflect the changes we mentioned last week for tier four. This will then reflect in the doctrine that is changing for tiers three through one. This doctrine should be updated by the beginning of the next fiscal year. The Integrated Weapons Training Strategy will provide units an objective, honest assessment of what their Paratroopers

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The Value of Backgrounds With Teaching

Something that's been bugging me of late and I have to rant a bit about...let me be blunt (as those who know me can appreciate) - I CAN GIVE TWO BIG SHITS WHAT YOUR BACKGROUND IS WHEN IT COMES TO TEACHING ME ABOUT SHOOTING!!!!! That's right...anybody who knows me, knows I know my way around guns. But what's more important is, how I got to know my way around guns MATTERS THE FUCK NOT!!!!! It suffices, that if somebody can concisely, succinctly and confidently make a logical teaching point, I DO NOT validate that point by asking that person, "ok...what SOF unit were you in" before I take that lesson and use it to it's fullest. I've learned over time that I'm a good judge of character and experience has shown me that I have a knack for surviving gun fights and making young Soldiers into old ones. But the most important lesson I've learned is that the youngest Soldier does not define that person's level of competency. What I've learned is that confidence, maturity, logic intelligence and the ability to use common sense to validate fundamental truths comes in all shapes, sizes, colors, age and EXPERIENCE LEVELS!!!!! My belief

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Citizens Defense Research’s The Armed Parent/Guardian AAR

So my friend John Johnston of Ballistic Radio called me out on a recent Primary and Secondary modcast to check out his class Contextual Handgun: The Armed Parent/Guardian.  Since the class was only about 90 minutes away and hosted by the Sentinel of Freedom John Murphy at FPF Training, in Culpeper, Virginia, how could I resist? Later I was grateful to find out that Melody Lauer would be there and bring some sophistication to even out this cocktail of knuckle draggers. Together this duo forms Citizens Defense Research. I was, to say the least, intrigued. Before we begin let me lay out my background to see if me opinions are relevant to you. Lifelong martial artist (TKD, Muay Thai, BJJ), no LEO or military experience (save being an Air Force brat), NRA pistol instructor (who isn’t?). I have received previous training from George Wehby of BlackBelt Tactical, Matt Jacques of Victory First, John Murphy of FPF Training, Chris Sizelove of 1st Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, Aaron Brumley of Solo Defense, Steve Fisher of Sentinel Concepts, Greg Ellifritz of Active Response Training, Pat Goodale and Wayne Fisher of PFT Training, Ernest Langdon of Langdon Tactical and private training with Al DeLeon of the State Dept’s

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Critical Equipment

This article began as some thoughts when I was listening to the P&S Kyle Defoor interview a few months ago, and I am finally putting thoughts on paper (or the internet’s version of paper). “Tell me about your rifle” (here) was Kyle’s question that started me thinking. On a similar vein, more handgun-focused, was the phrase “tell me a story about your pistol.” Ask yourself “How confident am I in my gear?” In that worst case scenario where a failure of your gear means grave bodily injury or death, can you count on it all the time, every time? If not, why not? How can you bring your gear up to that level of trust? Watching videos of many violent encounters, you quickly realize how vital the opening moments are. As someone closes distance, can you guarantee that your handgun is where it should be? Will it have fallen out, shifted position drastically, or otherwise become unavailable? When you press the trigger, how sure are you that the gun will fire, and that is will hit at the point of aim of your sights? If you grab your rifle, is your optic going to be on? Will it have shifted to

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AAR’s for Scenario Based Training: How to and Why

AAR. What is it? After Action Review is the short answer. Why do we do them? Because we have to. Because we’re supposed to. First Sergeant said to. Because I like to hear myself talk. The correct answer should be to give the students (soldiers, cops, whoever) feedback on their performance, to facilitate learning and to make them better. As a young infantryman I hated AARs, I felt like they were just a waste of my time. I would rather be training, or eating, or sleeping, or playing grab ass. These, many moons later, I feel quite differently about it. I honestly think that AARs are only slightly less important than the actual training itself, but only if done correctly. Over the years it has become clear to me that most people simply don’t know how to conduct an AAR. I don’t recall ever being given specific training on how to conduct one. And if you ask me to sit through one like I used to have to endure, I’ll still think it’s a waste of time. An AAR gives the students time to reflect on what happened, what they did, what they did well, and what they could have

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Sucked Down the Tube: A Failure in Training

Much, if not all training and practice is conducted on flat ranges under calm conditions with no surprises. We shoot steel and paper that we purposely place and identify. We have lanes and all sorts of safety considerations that make a day at the range a pleasant experience.  This is fine for most of us but can lead to some critical failures if you are in a line of work that may not look the same as the flat range.  For those that form either the thin Blue or Green Lines targets will probably appear in from unknown positions and ranges. Many people preach situational awareness but fail to account for it in our training. COL Boyd gave us the OODA loop, which on the surface, is a rapidly trainable flow of Observe, Orient, Decide and Act. It is a loop because as soon as you act you start over. Observe. To hit a target, you must first observe it. You could possibly be an intergalactic grand sensei with Generation Next hardware and you will still miss a target you didn’t see. With the proliferation of magnified optics, the tendency of getting sucked down the tube is becoming more prolific

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Inches, Minutes, Clicks- Zero That Blaster

Zeroing is literally one of the most important thing we need to accomplish with our rifles and #spacegun pistols. There is much talk around the technique to accomplish this but there is one way that is easy and fast. First, determine the desired zero distance.  This will vary by rifle, optic, caliber, and most importantly purpose of the firearm. Many people with AR15 rifles use either a 100, 200, or 300 yard/meter zero. Rather, many people claim to use those ranges but most use the near zero distance on either 25 or 50-yard target. Yes, I am talking in yards here because most people on this page are not using meters. Now, to save yourself time, you can use a borelight or something like the Telluric Group Small Arms Collimator. There are lasers available in every price range and should be part of your tool kit. Doing this step will put you at the very least on paper at 25/50 which will save you rounds and frustration. Ask me how I know. Regardless of borelight or not, it’s time to shoot bullets. Get into the most comfortable and stable position possible. One that you can duplicate easily. For you Army

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A Reminder for Myself and Other Instructors

A lot of times, we take our own repetitions for granted.  As we're teaching, it's easy to become frustrated with students that "just aren't getting it."  And since I'm a nobody, instructor-wise, I get a lot of students that are prone to "just not getting it."  A lot of the top level national guys get students who've trained at a high level before.  And so it's easy to have a line full of switched-on guys that have already built tens of thousands of reps.  We come to those national guys, most of the time, with years if not decades of firearms experience. As a student on their lines, I love that.  We aren't held up by a number of students who are just really slow to pick up some basic concept that we started workin on 20 years ago.  And as a student, it's really easy to get frustrated with "that person" in the class.  You know the one.  The Private Pyles of the class.  We've all seen it.  We've all been frustrated by it. But today, I've had a stark lesson in why we should never let that frustration show, and really, should soften our thinking on it. I

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