Mindset

Matt Landfair

Matt Six Actual
Staff member
Administrator
#1
I don't think we have this problem here:

http://monderno.com/training/mindset/

Mindset
by Guest Contributor on May 13, 2015 in Training

I was disappointed recently when reading an article promoted by pro-gun people about a conceal carry permit holder and how he saved the day. The saving the day part is fine; it’s wonderful. The fact that the concealed carrier admitted he never had any intention of pressing the trigger to stop the bad guys is the part that pisses me off. Had the suspects fought him, he would not be under “hero” status but victim or dead status.

If you have that mindset of not intending to use the weapon you carry, why don’t you just carry a toy? Better yet, so you are not a liability, don’t carry anything. This lack of mindset reminds me of most open carriers that I encounter. Condition white (that means oblivious to things around them), crappy sidearm, horrible holster, and a hope the mere presence of a firearm will stop crime. Naturally these types have had no formal training and would rather buy more firearms and crappy knock off accessories than invest in any type of training.



If your mindset and decision making is based off tacticool appearances you need to stay home. Inexpensive options are hardly ever a solution to anything outside of losing money. A batbelt full of crap is no match to a simple proven sidearm, good training, and the proper mindset. When I mention proven, I mean it functions and provides a desired performance (which includes accuracy and dependability), not a sample of one, but a sample size of thousands that whole agencies use.

Back to the mindset of our hero who isn’t willing to take a life in order to save a life – if you have in your head a preconceived idea what evil looks like you are already behind the power curve. Think about the world we live in, think about the people who are involved in evil violent action, now open your eyes to the truth – realize the fact that these people include both genders, all races, and all ages.

If you find you are without that mindset, but you want to still carry – it is time for professional instruction. It is possible Jim-Bob with only an NRA instructor certificate in your town might be able to provide sufficient training to cure this issue, but when is sufficient a standard? Go beyond sufficient – take a course from a recognized professional instructor who has an extensive background in the skillsets you desire.

Keep in mind there are bad guys meaner than you. There are bad guys that will outgun you, out think you, out fight you. Your mind needs to be already set as to what you will do when you need to act decisively. If you aren’t training, if you aren’t more aware of your surroundings, if you are not using modern proven weapons and equipment – all you are is a liability and a potential victim.

Matt Landfair is a veteran law enforcement officer, firearms instructor, DARC LECTC-1 adjunct instructor in training, and founder of primaryandsecondary.com.
 
#2
Eh, I think the author of this is a little long winded and....I kid, I kid!
I spend a good bit of time in my local mom and pop type gun store since I've known the folks who run it since I was a kid. Just standing there and people watching tells me that more people need to read this. The craptastic holsters and the hunk of metal that sits inside of them make me cringe at times.

With your permission, matt, I'd love to print this out and tape it somewhere in the store. The owners sure as hell wouldn't mind and it may help them sell some of those "expensive" guns.
 

AT Armor

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#4
....

.....If you find you are without that mindset, but you want to still carry – it is time for professional instruction. It is possible Jim-Bob with only an NRA instructor certificate in your town might be able to provide sufficient training to cure this issue, but when is sufficient a standard? Go beyond sufficient – take a course from a recognized professional instructor who has an extensive background in the skillsets you desire......
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Not throwing rocks at all Matt, just a thought that this brought out. We have had the discussion before on here re "can mindset be taught?". Im of the opinion (based in a lot of years of training and leading soldiers) that mindset cannot be taught, but it can be learned / developed / internalized by influence from leaders, teachers, and mentors. The desired outcome may be to have an individual with the attributes you describe in the piece, but they will only be developed by almost indirect means such as vignettes, training scenarios, and mostly by providing an example for the student to emulate.
We are all almost too close to the problem set to philosophically divorce the best teacher of those mindset skills and abilities (the professional firearms instructor) from the marksmanship, weapon manipulation skills, and tactics we seek them out for. Could there be any other type of professional that could impart the knowledge, skills, and abilities that build the foundation for the mindset we choose to live? Probably not.
Long way around the barn to somewhat recommend refinement to Matt's point about the NRA~ish instructor imparting knowledge that may fill the training gap to a certain level, just not to a level of excellence. The skillsets that the aforementioned instructors may impart on a student will be part of it no matter what level they achieve (assuming it is valid instruction). However, to build a required baseline of KSA in the student to foster development of that desired mindset (we didnt say teach mindset anywhere in here) we have to have a professional. It could very well be that local guy...but he had better damn well be more than a marksmanship and weapons manipulation instructor.
 

Matt Landfair

Matt Six Actual
Staff member
Administrator
#5
This ties into that to an extent:

There is a person who I know via the Internet who is known for extremely accurate gun/gear/videogame/training/combat/warload information. He and I have some of the same contacts within our networks. He mentioned something about his daily carry weapon in a conversation. Due to that conversation I copied the weapon and its configuration.

A popular instructor is known for detailed AAR’s on forums to the point that people base their equipment load outs, weapon setups, and choices of weapons – without attending his classes. I read nothing but good reviews and the subject matter was pertinent to the skill sets I was interested. I followed his advice on guns and gear and even hosted him for several courses to teach.

A forum member posted a video highlight reel of a training course and facility. I have some friends who know the main guy at the facility. I heard tremendously positive reviews about the training from multiple reputable sources. I traveled. I attended the training. I have returned for multiple attendances and I am working on being an instructor there.

All of these examples are positive influences from social media or forums. Unfortunately this is not always the case when following info found in a forum or in social media. These are powerful mediums. They can cause you to spend a lot of money, but in a good way if you are using them right.

How do you figure out whom to listen to?

-Background - does this person have a background in the subject matter they are discussing?

-Networking - do people you respect within your network respect them?

-Logic – does the information provided make sense?

-Conflict - has the source’s information conflicted with itself?

-Signal to noise ratio – is there sufficient information on the topic you are studying or is there more off topic shenanigans?

All of these factors alone are not enough. Fact checking and verifying is always a good idea, no matter the source.

Now, getting that carry weapon was done pretty much blind. The Gunslinger already is a known vetted entity and I was willing to take the chance. Since that conversation and getting mine – the concept seems to have become quite popular. We have even nicknamed the configuration the “Gunslinger Special.”
 
#6
We have had the discussion before on here re "can mindset be taught?". Im of the opinion (based in a lot of years of training and leading soldiers) that mindset cannot be taught, but it can be learned / developed / internalized by influence from leaders, teachers, and mentors. The desired outcome may be to have an individual with the attributes you describe in the piece, but they will only be developed by almost indirect means such as vignettes, training scenarios, and mostly by providing an example for the student to emulate.
I agree that mindset can be encouraged/inculcated, but passively "taught", I strongly doubt it.

Ken Murray provides a superb rationale for the relevance of reality-based training in his book, Training at The Speed of Life. I recommend this book highly; not just for the training-specific discussion, but for his extensive research and explication of the warrior tradition and state of mind.