Mr. John Chapman Joins B.E. Meyers & Co. Inc. As Latest MAWL™ Brand Ambassador and Certified Trainer

February, 22nd, 2017 (Redmond, WA) – B.E. Meyers & Co. Inc. is proud to announce that Mr. John Chapman, a.k.a. “Chappy”, is joining the B.E. Meyers Team as our latest Brand Ambassador for the MAWL™ Modular Advanced Weapon Laser system.  This is part of Chappy’s continued law enforcement training efforts while also CEO of Raven Concealment. “I am honored to be joining the B.E. Meyers team”, said Chappy. “The combination of proven designers and engineers working with experienced applications experts has enabled B.E. Meyers to create the MAWL-DA, the most capable multi-function small arms laser system I have used.  I am excited to educate the law enforcement tactical community on the overwhelming benefits of the MAWL™ and B.E. Meyers other signature products for the military and law enforcement community.”   “Chappy brings years of experience to the team, and acts as a conduit for the voice of the customer as we move forward into future products”, said Matt Meyers, President at B.E. Meyers & Co. Inc.  “One of our core goals is to be the most end-user centric photonics company in the industry, and Chappy will undoubtedly be a critical part of that path”.  Chappy joins the current certified MAWL™

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Matt Landfair
Lead Editor/Contributor at Primary & Secondary
Active Law Enforcement background since before the turn of the century in the middle of no where. Firearms instructor, armorer, hangs out at DARC, has attended numerous training courses including DARC, Follow Through Consulting, EAG, TMacs, and more boring mandatory popo training you can shake a stick at. He has written for RECOIL Magazine, Breach Bang Clear, Soldier Systems Daily and Monderno. Enjoys long walks on the beach, blah blah blah… Known as Matt Prime or Riafdnal in some circles.

Matt@primaryandsecondary.com

Q/A on IWTS

We are answering some questions that have been brought up in reference to the Integrated Weapons Training Strategy and how it is reported. As we discussed in previous posts, there are six tables for each gate, and four gates that take the unit from individual training through unit training. Specifically today, we will address what it takes for a squad or.vehicle crew to be qualified. The reference for our discussion is TC 3-20.0 dated June 2015. Above illustrates what this looks like for the squad. Table I is a Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures evaluation. Gate II is simulations: for the squad, this entails use of simulation systems to practice coordination between the teams. Gate III is the TADSS, for the squad is MILES Gears. Table IV is the squad STX lane. It is dry-fire as an organization. Paratroopers need to practice not only their shot process, but also need to be communicating with their fellow team members. Team leaders need to learn and reinforce that they are in control of what the team does or does not do. New squad leaders learn that this is where you take that step back and look at the bigger picture. Table V is

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Raymond Miller
82nd Airborne Division Small Arms Master Gunner: primary weapons trainer, force modernization for individual weapons, and range liason for the 82nd.

Fire Commands

We are going to address something that is common for machine guns and AT weapons to need to know; fire commands. The reference for this is FM 3-22.68 Dated July 2006. A fire command is a command given to deliver effective fire on a target quickly and without confusion. There are six elements to a fire command: the Alert that the guns are going to fire, a cardinal direction to the target, along with an estimated range, a description of the target, the Method of fire, and the command to fire. We will discuss each of these elements separately. The alert lets the gun teams know which guns will be engaging the threat: Gun 1, Gun 2, or both. The direction can be done one of three ways: by speaking, pointing (either with a hand, or with a laser), with tracer fire, or with reference points. The description gives the gunners a visualization of what the target is, if they cannot see it clearly (or at all, in the case of defilade fires). The range is an estimation by the weapons squad leader. A technique that can be used is to take the laser range finders that are a part

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Raymond Miller
82nd Airborne Division Small Arms Master Gunner: primary weapons trainer, force modernization for individual weapons, and range liason for the 82nd.

Aimpoint RDS and Pistol Mounting PSA

Aimpoint RDS and Pistol mounting PSA Last year I finally got into the RDS equipped Glock game, using a ALG Defense 6 Second Mount on a Gen 4 Glock 22. About 100 rounds into learning the gun, the dot disappeared. I contacted Aimpoint, and they took care of replacing the pre 2009 well used and abused 4 MOA T-1 with a new 2 MOA T1. In the meantime I used another pre 2009 used and abused 4 MOA T-1 on that gun. It had no issues in the mean time.   A couple months ago, I received a testing model of the Raven Concealment Balor optic mount. I took the used 4 MOA T-1 and put it on the Balor and then mounted it on the Gen 4 Glock 22. About 200 rounds into it, well dot/dial broke. Again, I contacted Aimpoint. Aimpoint rapidly took care of warranty work on this, but more importantly for those interested in a Aimpoint RDS on a Glock, I received the following advice. While there is no proof that the Aimpoint T-1 family is being killed on pistols, there have been more than one optic killed when mounted to a pistol. While researching that,

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Matt Levi
Contributor at Primary & Secondary
Over 7 years in Law Enforcement. Matt Has a background in firearms and firearms training, and has been trying to learn from those with more knowledge and experience than he. This has involved recognizing that he needs to attend outside training and has led him to take training with Vickers Tactical, DARC, LMS Defense and others.

More Zeroing With Boresight

We are going to continue our discussion on the Laser Boresight. Specifically, we are going to talk about how to zero the enabler with a zeroed LBS. The reference for this is TM 9-5860-226-13&P dated August 2007. To learn how to zero the Laser Boresight, and why it is important to do this, reference the TTP Thursday post from last week. Now that we have established a good solid zero for the boresight, the next task we will conduct will be zeroing the weapon. To do that, we start with as solid a position as possible. There are three people involved in this process: the Weapon man making corrections to the optic, the Target man who has secured the appropriate offset to the wall, and the Paratrooper whose weapon is being zeroed. The Paratrooper assumes a very stable position. The prone supported with a sand sock if possible is ideal. Bench rests or a gun vise are an excellent method of securing the weapon as well. The Paratrooper acquires their sight picture with their optic, and as soon as their dot is on the dot at the center of the target, they call out ‘mark.’ The Target man looks at

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Raymond Miller
82nd Airborne Division Small Arms Master Gunner: primary weapons trainer, force modernization for individual weapons, and range liason for the 82nd.

Machine Gun: Ammunition Planning

We are continuing our discussion on machine gun theory, specifically we are addressing an oft overlooked thing for support by fire: Ammunition planning. I know most of us thought we were joining the military and we wouldn't have to do math anymore, but we were wrong. Ammunition planning is in doctrine in the ATP 3-21.8 dated April of 2016. The first thing you must know is what the rates of fire are for your specific weapons system. Pictures one and two illustrate the sustained, rapid, and cyclic rates of fire for our machine guns. Once that is done, as a part of the mission planning process, the weapons squad leader needs to identify key events, allocate ammunition to each event based off SOP, some units want 15 seconds of rapid rate to establish the support by fire or when shifting fires. Others want 30. The Weapons Squad Leader takes that into account and gets the total figures needed per gun. The Weapons Squad Leader then analyzes this amount and adjusts if necessary. The main planning point with this is knowing your rates of fire. Sustained should be approximately nine rounds per burst with a four to five second pause in between. That

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Raymond Miller
82nd Airborne Division Small Arms Master Gunner: primary weapons trainer, force modernization for individual weapons, and range liason for the 82nd.

Calling the Shot

We are continuing our discussion on the functional element of control. Specifically we will be discussing ‘calling the shot.’ The reference for this is TC 3-22.9 Change 1, dated January 2017. Calling the shot, is when the Paratrooper notes where the sights or reticle is when the weapon discharges. This is essential so that the Paratrooper can perform a shot-by-shot analysis of their groups. This expression is usually given in a clock direction and inches from their desired point of aim. If the Paratrooper is on target, then the call is ‘center-hold.’ If the Paratrooper is honest with themselves at the beginning, there will be very few center calls. This also means that the Paratrooper is responsible for every call, both bad and good. This reinforces in the Paratroopers’ mind that they are the primary safety of the weapon, and responsible for knowing their target, what’s in front of, around, and behind it. When the shot is called, a Paratrooper can diagnose bad habits. For example, if the paratroopers keeps jerking their trigger, and they are right handed, they will notice the sights will be right of the target when the trigger breaks. Calling the shot carries over from the

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Raymond Miller
82nd Airborne Division Small Arms Master Gunner: primary weapons trainer, force modernization for individual weapons, and range liason for the 82nd.

Follow Up on TC 3-22.9

A year ago, we finished the last edits on the TC 3-22.9 that published in May of 2016. For those that have taken the time to read this book, you know it’s very different than the books we have used since the 1970’s.  For those that haven’t, this post will hold less value because you have no context. I just wanted to take a few minutes to post up some responses to issues that have been brought up recently from those that are finally realizing that there is a new Sheriff in town. First off, I want to explain a bit about how books are produced in the US Army. The short version is an NCO or Officer sits at a computer and types the book. From there it goes to paid editors who are SMEs in formatting, word usage, and English. The writer has a graphics team who make bad pictures into awesome things. Then the book is set through several levels of what is called Staffing. Staffing is simply getting the draft into people hands for comments. Usually it starts with stake holders and prior to publishing the draft is sent to “World Wide Staffing” The draft is

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Ash Hess
Senior NCO in the US Army currently serving as the Senior Writer for Small Arms in the Weapons and Gunnery Branch at the Maneuver Center of Excellence Fort Benning, Georgia .
Army Schools include US Army Master Marksmanship Trainer Course, Rifle Marksmanship Instructor Course, Urban Combat Leaders Course, Air Assault, Rappelmaster, Senior Leaders Course, Army Basic Instructor course, High Angle Marksmanship Course, and Unit Armorer course.

Has also attended the TigerSwan Basic Carbine course, Defoor Proformance Advanced Carbine and Scoped Rifle courses, Sionics Weapon Systems M4 Armorer course, and the MDTS Practical Small Knife 1course.

Four combat tours totaling fifty-two months overseas.

Bawidamann Denlinger OWB Mag Pouch

After seeing a Soldier Systems Daily article about the Bawidamann holster now called the Gotham, I wanted to look into further into the holster. So I bought one. I was already familiar with Bawidamann horizontal mag pouches and their blades by reputation - that reputation being quite good.  Long backstory short, the holster is outstanding. Excellent passive retention, nicely finished, very well constructed, very comfortable, sturdy. This is coming from someone who has been wearing weapons appendix for a number of years, so comfort is relative. Mid January I acquired a small selection of Bawidamann mag pouches: the already well known horizontal Uber CC for standard Glock mags as well and a newer Uber CC for a G43, and the vertical Denlinger for my 9mm double stack Glocks and  one for my G43. Similarly crafted to the Gotham, the finely made Denlinger is a low profile OWB streamlined single mag pouch. The pouch affixes to your belt via a flexible strip that is permanently attached to the bottom with screws and heavy rubber washers and the top has a one way snap. This pouch does have a smaller footprint compared to other similar pouches due to needing only one belt attachment

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Matt Landfair on FacebookMatt Landfair on InstagramMatt Landfair on Twitter
Matt Landfair
Lead Editor/Contributor at Primary & Secondary
Active Law Enforcement background since before the turn of the century in the middle of no where. Firearms instructor, armorer, hangs out at DARC, has attended numerous training courses including DARC, Follow Through Consulting, EAG, TMacs, and more boring mandatory popo training you can shake a stick at. He has written for RECOIL Magazine, Breach Bang Clear, Soldier Systems Daily and Monderno. Enjoys long walks on the beach, blah blah blah… Known as Matt Prime or Riafdnal in some circles.

Matt@primaryandsecondary.com

Functional Element Of Weapon Control

We are continuing our discussion on the functional element of control. Specifically, we will be addressing workspace management. The reference for this study is TC 3-22.9 dated January 2017. TC 3-22.9 defines the workspace as a spherical area, approximately 12-18 inches in diameter centered on the Paratrooper’s chin and about 12 inches in front of it. In this space is where the majority of weapons manipulations take place. The picture below illustrates what this zone looks like. The reason we use the workspace is so that the Paratrooper can maintain their eyes oriented towards the threat and still be able to conduct critical weapons tasks that require hand/eye coordination. In so doing this, the Paratrooper creates efficiency in their movements, getting the weapon fully operational in the shortest amount of time. Keep in mind, the location of the workspace will vary depending upon the firing position being used. The only way to determine what is efficient for the Paratrooper is for them to actually get into the positions and attempt to manipulate the weapon through the dry-fire drills. Many different techniques can be employed to make the workspace more efficient. An example is the placement of the buttstock, some prefer

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Raymond Miller
82nd Airborne Division Small Arms Master Gunner: primary weapons trainer, force modernization for individual weapons, and range liason for the 82nd.

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