Evolutions In Outfitting The Modern Police Officer

I have worked within law enforcement (LE) since the last century. I  have worked with leadership that recognized the importance of officer safety and enacted proactive polices which maximized police effectiveness through modern equipment and training.  Currently, police officers do everything from teaching classes in elementary schools to direct combat with terrorist forces.  As a school resource officer, I taught several D.A.R.E. (Drug Awareness Resistance Education) classes a day at the local elementary schools and still responded to all types of incidents.  Our officers have ever changing job duties as well as high expectations from the public.  In order to more safely and effectively conduct their duties, upgrading equipment and uniforms to a more versatile and functional condition will help with officer and public safety. Police departments are funded by the cities the serve.  Outfitting and updating police a department is expensive.  There are federal programs that allow the use of used military equipment for police work.  Equipment offered with these federal programs included at one time: weapons, armored vehicles, non-armored vehicles, night vision, generators, vehicle parts, combat uniforms- nearly everything. Some items require fees to be paid, some items are free.  All of these items are on loan from

READ MORE


Matt Landfair on FacebookMatt Landfair on InstagramMatt Landfair on Twitter
Matt Landfair
Lead Editor/Contributor at Primary & Secondary
Active Law Enforcement background since before the turn of the century in the middle of no where. Firearms instructor, armorer, hangs out at DARC, has attended numerous training courses including DARC, Follow Through Consulting, EAG, TMacs, and more boring mandatory popo training you can shake a stick at. He has written for RECOIL Magazine, Breach Bang Clear, Soldier Systems Daily and Monderno. Enjoys long walks on the beach, blah blah blah… Known as Matt Prime or Riafdnal in some circles.

Matt@primaryandsecondary.com

Leading Fighting Men

This is one man's musings, and over the course of my career they are things that I wanted from my leaders. As such, I have tried hard to be that guy as a current leader. This is meant for discussion, not as a how to guide. One of my greatest strengths as a leader is that I recognize how big of a failure I have been as one. Waxing poetic about leadership traits does not make you a leader. Indeed, the one true test, and really the only one that matters to me, is whether the men think I'm doing a good job as a leader. My team "votes" for team leaders, this doesn't mean that Chiefs couldn't over ride the vote, they can, but that has never happened since we started handing out 3X5 cards and asking dudes to write down the four names they want running an operation on the worst day, in the worst possible circumstances. I take great pride that the men have written my name down, not just once, but on every vote. Unanimously on the last one. And I assure you that this is not a popularity contest, these dudes get it and want

READ MORE


Bill Blowers
Bill Blowers has been a police officer for over 20 years, prior to that he was in the US Army for six years. Bill is currently a Sergeant for a Municipal Agency in Washington State. He is assigned to his agencies training unit and is also a team leader on a large and active regional SWAT team. He has been assigned to SWAT since 1995 and has held positions such as Sniper, Ballistic Shield Carrier, Entry Team Member, and Assistant Team Leader. He has planned, or participated in, over 1000 missions and has in excess of 5000 documented training hours.

https://primaryandsecondary.com/psal/tap-rack-tactical/

Night Vision Quick Focus Caps

Using NVG’s for a multitude of Law Enforcement tasks presents some challenges from typical white light jobs. One of those challenges is that the NVG is focused at a given distance, typically at infinity. The problem with this is when you need to see or examine something at close range. This requires that the NVG be manipulated to change the focus point, which in turn creates a new issue being that you cannot discriminate something at distance because it is blurred. There are a few remedies for this, one of those remedies is to make a tight “OK” hand signal and place that over the objective lens. This blocks the number of photons entering the tube and changes the focus to being much closer. You can adjust the size of the “aperture” by simply making a tighter or looser “OK”. Benefit is it’s free and you always have it, down side is trying to determine the right size and also manipulate other things with the hand that is occupied making the “OK”. Several manufacturers make focus caps, they range in price from over $200 to $9. They all do the same thing, reduce the numbers of Photons entering the tube

READ MORE


Bill Blowers
Bill Blowers has been a police officer for over 20 years, prior to that he was in the US Army for six years. Bill is currently a Sergeant for a Municipal Agency in Washington State. He is assigned to his agencies training unit and is also a team leader on a large and active regional SWAT team. He has been assigned to SWAT since 1995 and has held positions such as Sniper, Ballistic Shield Carrier, Entry Team Member, and Assistant Team Leader. He has planned, or participated in, over 1000 missions and has in excess of 5000 documented training hours.

https://primaryandsecondary.com/psal/tap-rack-tactical/

Knock & Announce

I was recently in a class where a discussion about “No knock” and “Knock & Announce” (K&A) warrant service was discussed. The context of the discussion was in relation to police use of night vision for warrant service. I have previously written an article with some thoughts and guidelines for NVG use by police, the discussion above transitioned to law in general. I have previously heard from other cops about what a “reasonable amount of time” is during the K&A procedure. The reality is that there is no defined time, officers must make that determination for themselves. The US Supreme court ruled as much in the case US V Banks. In that case officers testified that they waited 15-20 seconds for Banks to open the door. Banks was wanted for distribution of cocaine and the warrant was served at 1400 hours. Banks moved to suppress evidence citing that 15-20 seconds was insufficient since he was in the shower and did not hear officers knocking. Even if he had, the time was insufficient for him to exit the shower and robe himself to open the door. The court noted that the case turned on “the significance of exigency revealed by circumstances

READ MORE


Bill Blowers
Bill Blowers has been a police officer for over 20 years, prior to that he was in the US Army for six years. Bill is currently a Sergeant for a Municipal Agency in Washington State. He is assigned to his agencies training unit and is also a team leader on a large and active regional SWAT team. He has been assigned to SWAT since 1995 and has held positions such as Sniper, Ballistic Shield Carrier, Entry Team Member, and Assistant Team Leader. He has planned, or participated in, over 1000 missions and has in excess of 5000 documented training hours.

https://primaryandsecondary.com/psal/tap-rack-tactical/

“The Best Gun Is The One You Have”

After reading many discussions on social media, specifically ones centered on firearms, I have found one phrase that people drop out of context frequently. This phrase usually is in a discussion where someone is defending a poor choice and trying to make someone else feel better about their poor choice. Let's discuss the copout of "The best gun is the one you have." Apply this concept to different circumstances - preparedness and food storage. A recent natural disaster has closed off transportation to your area. Roadways aren't expected to be opened back up for a week. You haven't prepared properly so you have a quarter bag of dog food and some leftovers... the best food storage is the food storage you have. Spending a couple dollars more at the grocery store on some canned food for storage is considered preparedness. Apply this concept to acquiring better choices in firearms - save a little more money weekly. I often hear the excuse that people can't afford a more suitable gun - buying a subpar option instead is taking resources away from this viable option. Cutting back on a habit in order to save a little more for a better solution ultimately

READ MORE


Matt Landfair on FacebookMatt Landfair on InstagramMatt Landfair on Twitter
Matt Landfair
Lead Editor/Contributor at Primary & Secondary
Active Law Enforcement background since before the turn of the century in the middle of no where. Firearms instructor, armorer, hangs out at DARC, has attended numerous training courses including DARC, Follow Through Consulting, EAG, TMacs, and more boring mandatory popo training you can shake a stick at. He has written for RECOIL Magazine, Breach Bang Clear, Soldier Systems Daily and Monderno. Enjoys long walks on the beach, blah blah blah… Known as Matt Prime or Riafdnal in some circles.

Matt@primaryandsecondary.com

Magpul and Gibbz Arms Settle Patent Infringement Lawsuit

December 14, 2016 — Magpul Industries Corp. announced today that has settled its patent infringement lawsuit against Gibbens Engineering Group, LLC, a/k/a Gibbz Arms, which was pending in the United States District Court for the Western District of Texas. Magpul’s initial complaint asserted that Gibbz Arms infringed three Magpul utility patents by selling the “Gibbz Arms Modular Attachment (GAMA) System.” Magpul’s amended complaint reasserted those utility patents and sought a preemptive declaration that Magpul’s M-LOK® system did not infringe any Gibbz Arms patents. Gibbz Arms’ answer to Magpul’s amended complaint asserted as a defense that the GAMA System did not infringe Magpul’s patents. The companies settled their dispute on confidential and mutually agreeable terms. Under the terms of the settlement, Gibbz Arms agreed to assign patent rights related to the dispute to Magpul. Adopters and licensees of Magpul’s M-LOK® system continue to have complete freedom to operate without interference, and M-LOK adoption will continue to be available via free license to interested parties. About Magpul Founded in 1999, Magpul was launched with the intent of developing innovative devices to aid in the manipulation of rifle magazines while reloading under stress. The company’s name comes from this original product called the

READ MORE


Primary & Secondary on FacebookPrimary & Secondary on InstagramPrimary & Secondary on Twitter
Primary & Secondary
Primary & Secondary is a network created to discuss professional grade modern weapons and their applications with supporting equipment and skills.

Tactical Tailor Tahoma Tote Rucksack Review

Author's note: This pack appears to have been renamed the "RR2600 Assault Malice Pack" according to Tactical Tailor's website. There appear to be no differences according to their descriptions and display images, however this has not been confirmed by Tactical Tailor as of the time of this publishing.  There's no place like home, and if you are one of those people that often carries "home" on your back, then you know  that you are always looking for a better place to live. In my ongoing search for that perfect unicorn, I came across the Tahoma Tote. It had a lot of features I was looking for:  lighter weight, medium sized ruck with an external frame, the ability to stow/carry a rifle, modularity, and a load profile that rode closer to the body and spread the weight vertically versus horizontally.  From the horse's mouth, the description is as follows: "Features RTO Zipper pass through 2 external side zips allowing for access to interior of ruck 3 side compression straps w/G hooks on each side 1x5 name tape loop panel on top pocket Internal attachment points for TT PRC 117G Radio pouch MOLLE attachment points on lower left and right side of

READ MORE


Rick Labistre
Contributor at Primary & Secondary
Rick Labistre is a 14 year Army veteran and has served in every position in an Infantry platoon from rifleman to squad leader, as well as scout to platoon sergeant in a light Infantry reconnaissance platoon. He is a 2011 graduate of the ARNG Sniper School and is currently a sniper section leader with the California Army National Guard

Main Gun Coffee Company: First Sergeant Blend

Been sampling the Main Gun Coffee Company First Sergeant blend. I like it. It's a darker roast than the Belt Fed (I'd call it a medium roast, it's not a dark roast, but darker than the Belt Fed), with a light body, and mild cacao and red wine notes. Being a darker roast, you taste the fire more than the lighter roast, which gives it a hint of smokiness on the back end. Those are really just hints under the excellent coffee taste, which is pretty awesome. Many darker roast coffees can be a little too much for some folks, as they're either too dark (where you taste more of the roast, and it covers the natural flavors of the coffee), or they're heavy bodied which some folks find objectionable. The First Sergeant blend strikes a nice balance, just dark enough of a roast, with a light enough body to be a daily drinker. I tend to like my medium/darker roasted coffees with a little heavier body. If there was one thing I'd change about the blend, that would be it. Not a negative on the coffee, just a personal preference. That being said, the First Sergeant blend is the

READ MORE


Primary & Secondary on FacebookPrimary & Secondary on InstagramPrimary & Secondary on Twitter
Primary & Secondary
Primary & Secondary is a network created to discuss professional grade modern weapons and their applications with supporting equipment and skills.

SWAT Team Leader Course & Vetting Entities…

I am teaching another Team Leader course in a few weeks. During the course of a year and with different topics being taught, I invariably get asked whether my course is “certified” by a specific entity. One of the reasons I started a training company was because I felt like a lot of courses that I attended were liability driven, or lacked depth or left me wanting more from an instructor who could not relate what he was teaching to a specific example or callout. Whether or not a course is “certified”, does not mean it is good or bad. But the question is odd, since Tap-Rack Tactical, LLC is the only entity responsible for its course content. How can another entity certify it? Even POST certification doesn’t mean much since the person reviewing the course material may or may not know anything about the topic. Did they certify spelling and grammar on the PowerPoint, or the actual material? In the case of my team leader course, did a team leader with equal or greater experience than me review it? And even if they did, they haven’t sat through the class. The PowerPoint is designed to keep me on track

READ MORE


Bill Blowers
Bill Blowers has been a police officer for over 20 years, prior to that he was in the US Army for six years. Bill is currently a Sergeant for a Municipal Agency in Washington State. He is assigned to his agencies training unit and is also a team leader on a large and active regional SWAT team. He has been assigned to SWAT since 1995 and has held positions such as Sniper, Ballistic Shield Carrier, Entry Team Member, and Assistant Team Leader. He has planned, or participated in, over 1000 missions and has in excess of 5000 documented training hours.

https://primaryandsecondary.com/psal/tap-rack-tactical/

Speed Costs Money……

Speed costs money, how fast do ya wanna go  With the election upon us, it seems as if everyone now wants to buy, buy, buy firearms and gear “just in case.”  Which is cool, but not the way I would go. A firearm is a tool. That’s all. Much like a wrench or a ratchet. As such, quality is more important than quantity. There is not a pro team in any racing series that uses the 101-piece toolset from your local box store. There is a reason for that.  Quality  I am a self-declared tool snob and have been for over 25 years. During my relatively short foray into auto mechanics I used tools exclusively from a dude with a big white truck who came to the shop. No, I didn’t have money for pro tools. I didn’t even have the skills to “need” pro tools let alone the pay to go with them. That did not stop me. I didn’t have as many tools as the professional mechanics I was working with and my box never got above hobby grade before I left for other things. When it came time for war, I applied the same philosophy to my

READ MORE


Ash Hess
Senior NCO in the US Army currently serving as the Senior Writer for Small Arms in the Weapons and Gunnery Branch at the Maneuver Center of Excellence Fort Benning, Georgia .
Army Schools include US Army Master Marksmanship Trainer Course, Rifle Marksmanship Instructor Course, Urban Combat Leaders Course, Air Assault, Rappelmaster, Senior Leaders Course, Army Basic Instructor course, High Angle Marksmanship Course, and Unit Armorer course.

Has also attended the TigerSwan Basic Carbine course, Defoor Proformance Advanced Carbine and Scoped Rifle courses, Sionics Weapon Systems M4 Armorer course, and the MDTS Practical Small Knife 1course.

Four combat tours totaling fifty-two months overseas.

Pro Guns, Gear, Tactics, Training & Discussion

%d bloggers like this: