Tag Archives: instructor

The Do Everything Carbine

We see rifles set up for Close Quarte Battle (CQB), Designated Marksman (DM), Special Purpose Rifle (SPR), General Purpose (GP) and a myriad of other acronyms. While I fully support building of fine firearms, I just wanted to talk about a Do Everything carbine. First off, we must look at our application of the rifle. That’s the first thing we should determine prior to the build. Just like with cars, somethings are very specific and hinder other roles. The AR platform can literally be adapted to any role and is only limited by caliber. That limit is based on application as well. So here are some basic questions to ask when planning a build. What do I want it to do? What will I be doing the most? What is my skillset? What ranges will I be using it at the most? What type of shooting will I be doing? What is the budget?   Once you have some of these answers you can start planning the build. In days of old some things that were “facts” helped lead us in a direction. We thought that for accuracy at 600 yards we needed 18-20 inches of barrel hence the SPR.

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Speed Costs Money……

Speed costs money, how fast do ya wanna go  With the election upon us, it seems as if everyone now wants to buy, buy, buy firearms and gear “just in case.”  Which is cool, but not the way I would go. A firearm is a tool. That’s all. Much like a wrench or a ratchet. As such, quality is more important than quantity. There is not a pro team in any racing series that uses the 101-piece toolset from your local box store. There is a reason for that.  Quality  I am a self-declared tool snob and have been for over 25 years. During my relatively short foray into auto mechanics I used tools exclusively from a dude with a big white truck who came to the shop. No, I didn’t have money for pro tools. I didn’t even have the skills to “need” pro tools let alone the pay to go with them. That did not stop me. I didn’t have as many tools as the professional mechanics I was working with and my box never got above hobby grade before I left for other things. When it came time for war, I applied the same philosophy to my

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Lessons Learned As An Instructor

One of the biggest things I learned as a firearms instructor which took years of focus and near 360 degrees of observation of the student – the ability to assess whether there is a learning opportunity versus a teaching moment. Basically it is the ability to observe an issue and exploit it by weighing the situation and potential outcomes for the greatest benefit for the class and individual student. The core of this ability is knowing the subject matter inside and out and the ability to read your students. It’s easy to teach a firearms or a tactics course if you have a basic understanding of the material. Applying the material to drills and exercises can be a little more difficult but nothing overly hard. Though, easy and effective aren’t mutually exclusive. Having attended courses taught by the entire scale from bad to great instructors. I have seen some firsthand examples of what works and what doesn’t as far as teaching is concerned. If we look at the two extremes of firearms/tactics instruction we can get a better feel for where we should fit. 1. Heavy instruction with little practical exercise. Students have an overwhelming amount of information to process

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Becoming A Victim Of Our Frame of Reference

  “Never say always, never say never.” When we give advice as instructors, teachers, “that gun guy,” etc. we must be very careful that we do not become a victim of our frame of reference. What does this mean? LE, MIL, CCW and Hunters each will give advice based on their perspective. Many times they will stray from their lane and give advice that they have ZERO knowledge to give that advice on. Other times, they will give advice based on one event/experience and believe that it must fit with all situations. An example would be of the Elmer Fudd who takes a CCW class with John Doe where based on a single course of fire, they only needed a 5 shot revolver. Now Mr. Fudd takes to the internet to tell all that based on his “superior knowledge and experience” all they need is a 5 shot revolver in .44 magnum since you only need 5 shots. This same frame of reference is seen by many when they ask a LEO (my frame of reference to clarify) what they carry as a duty gun, and then pick that as their choice. For example, someone asks me what gun/ammo I

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