Category Archives: Primary & Secondary

Stuff About Us.

Sucked Down the Tube: A Failure in Training

Much, if not all training and practice is conducted on flat ranges under calm conditions with no surprises. We shoot steel and paper that we purposely place and identify. We have lanes and all sorts of safety considerations that make a day at the range a pleasant experience.  This is fine for most of us but can lead to some critical failures if you are in a line of work that may not look the same as the flat range.  For those that form either the thin Blue or Green Lines targets will probably appear in from unknown positions and ranges. Many people preach situational awareness but fail to account for it in our training. COL Boyd gave us the OODA loop, which on the surface, is a rapidly trainable flow of Observe, Orient, Decide and Act. It is a loop because as soon as you act you start over. Observe. To hit a target, you must first observe it. You could possibly be an intergalactic grand sensei with Generation Next hardware and you will still miss a target you didn’t see. With the proliferation of magnified optics, the tendency of getting sucked down the tube is becoming more prolific

READ MORE

Please follow and like us:

Inches, Minutes, Clicks- Zero That Blaster

Zeroing is literally one of the most important thing we need to accomplish with our rifles and #spacegun pistols. There is much talk around the technique to accomplish this but there is one way that is easy and fast. First, determine the desired zero distance.  This will vary by rifle, optic, caliber, and most importantly purpose of the firearm. Many people with AR15 rifles use either a 100, 200, or 300 yard/meter zero. Rather, many people claim to use those ranges but most use the near zero distance on either 25 or 50-yard target. Yes, I am talking in yards here because most people on this page are not using meters. Now, to save yourself time, you can use a borelight or something like the Telluric Group Small Arms Collimator. There are lasers available in every price range and should be part of your tool kit. Doing this step will put you at the very least on paper at 25/50 which will save you rounds and frustration. Ask me how I know. Regardless of borelight or not, it’s time to shoot bullets. Get into the most comfortable and stable position possible. One that you can duplicate easily. For you Army

READ MORE

Please follow and like us:

Running the Irons.

Iron sights have been part of shooting since the very least April 19th 1775. Aiming was a major part of our tactics that helped defeat the British unaimed volley fire. This being said, it should come as no surprise that we have learned, used, and lost uses for iron sights in all environments from jungles, deserts and even the frozen landscapes of Siberia. I am going to talk about a few of those techniques here. First anyone ever wonder why there are 2 apertures on the M16/AR15 platform? Most people have looked and wondered but never cared. Some wondered then tried switching between the two and found no gain from it. There is a reason for it but first we need to talk about sight alignment. Photo courtesy of FMJ Armory, LaGrange, GA TC 3-22.9 states “sight alignment is the relationship between the aiming device and the firer’s eye. To achieve proper and effective aim, the focus of the firer’s eye needs to be on the front sight post or reticle. The Soldier must maintain sight alignment throughout the aiming process.” It goes on to say for iron sights it is the “the relationship between the

READ MORE

Please follow and like us:

Stop Marksmanship Training

Since this organization is very gun friendly and dedicated to knowledge I should now have your attention. I just said it and will reiterate. STOP MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING IN THE ARMY. Weapons proficiency training is just that. If you call it marksmanship training and that’s your focus you’re doing it wrong. I’ve used the terms weapons proficiency training and weapons employment in my circle for a while and gotten on my soapbox when friends and colleagues say marksmanship training. I’ve verbally bludgeoned young NCOs and company grade officers to change their vernacular and some came along, some didn’t. Why? It’s simple. My personal definition of marksmanship is the ability or act of using a ballistic tool to put a hole in something at distance. It’s that simple. You’re a great shot? Awesome. Can you reduce a complex stoppage, in the dark, with rain or mud slickened hands? It doesn’t matter how well you shoot if you can’t keep your gun running. Do you have the mindset to continue shooting until the threat is down and obviously out of the fight rather than firing that shot or pair and looking to see where your bullets went? Good job champ- you just got

READ MORE

Please follow and like us:

Aimpoint RDS and Pistol Mounting PSA

Aimpoint RDS and Pistol mounting PSA Last year I finally got into the RDS equipped Glock game, using a ALG Defense 6 Second Mount on a Gen 4 Glock 22. About 100 rounds into learning the gun, the dot disappeared. I contacted Aimpoint, and they took care of replacing the pre 2009 well used and abused 4 MOA T-1 with a new 2 MOA T1. In the meantime I used another pre 2009 used and abused 4 MOA T-1 on that gun. It had no issues in the mean time.   A couple months ago, I received a testing model of the Raven Concealment Balor optic mount. I took the used 4 MOA T-1 and put it on the Balor and then mounted it on the Gen 4 Glock 22. About 200 rounds into it, well dot/dial broke. Again, I contacted Aimpoint. Aimpoint rapidly took care of warranty work on this, but more importantly for those interested in a Aimpoint RDS on a Glock, I received the following advice. While there is no proof that the Aimpoint T-1 family is being killed on pistols, there have been more than one optic killed when mounted to a pistol. While researching that,

READ MORE

Please follow and like us:

Follow Up on TC 3-22.9

A year ago, we finished the last edits on the TC 3-22.9 that published in May of 2016. For those that have taken the time to read this book, you know it’s very different than the books we have used since the 1970’s.  For those that haven’t, this post will hold less value because you have no context. I just wanted to take a few minutes to post up some responses to issues that have been brought up recently from those that are finally realizing that there is a new Sheriff in town. First off, I want to explain a bit about how books are produced in the US Army. The short version is an NCO or Officer sits at a computer and types the book. From there it goes to paid editors who are SMEs in formatting, word usage, and English. The writer has a graphics team who make bad pictures into awesome things. Then the book is set through several levels of what is called Staffing. Staffing is simply getting the draft into people hands for comments. Usually it starts with stake holders and prior to publishing the draft is sent to “World Wide Staffing” The draft is

READ MORE

Please follow and like us:

Institutional Inertia

“My greatest contribution as the chief of staff was to nourish the mavericks.” – GEN Matthew Ridgway, Commander, 82ND Airborne Division (1942-1945) and Chief of Staff, United States Army (1953-1955) Samuel Colt. Dr. Richard Gatling. John Moses Browning. Gaston Glock. These men are universally recognized as inventors of game changing items that swept the world and their names instantly recognized among many circles. But here's another whose invention was almost killed by members of the old guard with their set paradigm within the Army's Ordnance Department... Eugene Stoner and his AR-pattern rifle. Another example of an earthshattering development being resisted by the old guard is the repeating rifle- in fact it took President Abraham Lincoln interceding to force its adoption. Why? Institutional inertia. How do we break through this obstacle without presidential influence? First we have to define the problem. Institutional inertia is a term many of us have seen thrown around but what exactly is it? Who has defined it? I’ve searched the interwebz and found many articles that discuss it but no real definition. So let’s start by defining it, at least with the aid of the online dictionary and sprinkled with my opinion on the subject. Institutional

READ MORE

Please follow and like us:

The Do Everything Carbine

We see rifles set up for Close Quarte Battle (CQB), Designated Marksman (DM), Special Purpose Rifle (SPR), General Purpose (GP) and a myriad of other acronyms. While I fully support building of fine firearms, I just wanted to talk about a Do Everything carbine. First off, we must look at our application of the rifle. That’s the first thing we should determine prior to the build. Just like with cars, somethings are very specific and hinder other roles. The AR platform can literally be adapted to any role and is only limited by caliber. That limit is based on application as well. So here are some basic questions to ask when planning a build. What do I want it to do? What will I be doing the most? What is my skillset? What ranges will I be using it at the most? What type of shooting will I be doing? What is the budget?   Once you have some of these answers you can start planning the build. In days of old some things that were “facts” helped lead us in a direction. We thought that for accuracy at 600 yards we needed 18-20 inches of barrel hence the SPR.

READ MORE

Please follow and like us:

Sierra Tac 2 Point Adjustable Sling

I had this sling on a rifle from February 2016 to January 2017  as a T&E at request of the owner/designer. The Sierra Tac sling is similar to function with other 2 point adjustable slings on the market, except it has a adjustment slider that is made just for Sierra Tac. The adjuster is machined from a single billet of aluminum. Its made in America and sewn by Americans. https://www.instagram.com/p/BIu2vpbjcwA/?taken-by=sierratrainingllc To use the sling, you simply attach it at your preferred forward and reward placement (2” behind the gas block of a Carbine length gas system and outside rear stock is my preference). To adjust sling tension, you grasp the slider and move forward or backwards. While using the sling, I found that grabbing the whole slider mechanism makes it easier to loosen the sling. To tighten the sling, I grab the protruding part only. See below pictures for more detail on how. It adjusts very smoothly both in and out, a feature some 2 point slings do not have. The length of the sling is perfect for my use, both in a neck loop or in a over/under shoulder method. I can adjust the sling for wear over a

READ MORE

Please follow and like us:

Pushing Your Capabilities

Pushing Your Capabilities Last spring now, I shot the randomized department qualification course at my old agency. This particular course of fire involved handguns from 3 yards moving back to 50 yards with no time limits. Accuracy standards were the entirety of a box the same size as the classic “Q” target. Ignoring the obvious issues with such a course, i.e. anywhere is a hit and no speed factor, lets focus on what I learned. I shot as fast as I could while maintaining what I accept as accuracy - think IPSC "A" zone. Sadly, I was done before the other officers were done firing and with a tighter group. Most times one would say this should be bragging rights or something to feel good about. Well I was feeling good when I left the work qualifications, and went to shoot on my own. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLrRQ__gsOAs09EMBuYlJbFiz155LFz1_j First up for me was a list of Skill Drills from the Primary & Secondary Youtube channel. When I attempted to shoot the “Hateful Eight” drill, I realized that doing well at a lowest common denominator department qualification course of fire means nothing. It took me approximately 5 runs to get the course of fire completed

READ MORE

Please follow and like us: