When and where to use loctite? Red? Blue?

#1
It seems this topic has been covered before, but I can't find it.
Should one use red and need to heat it up to remove or will blue work just fine? Thoughts?



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Chris Taylor

Random Factor of the K Power
Moderator
#2
I think we had the discussion on the first iteration of the forum, which means it's lost to the gods of the interwebz.

As a general rule, blue 242 (or 243 for oily applications per the previous topic) is gtg. Red is for things that are "once and done" installs.

"When", in my opinion, is on about anything with threads.
 
#3
I agree with Chris except when you are dealing with pistol sights. I like to option of getting the old set off with reasonable work so they can be used on something else or passed on. If you greak that little screw in the Glock front sight, just throw it away.
 
#4
I use red on everything. When it is not soaked it does its job. A little heat may be needed and I've yet to see a little heat kill anything when loosening the loctite up.
 

Lane C

Rico and the Man
Moderator
#5
Blue 242 is what I use. It goes on anything with threads. Think of a carbine riding in a vehicle rack getting bounced a lot. Also the threads on holsters to prevent a premature separation from the mount platform. I even recently 242 my aegis belt buckle bolt to ensure it not coming apart.


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adam_s

Regular Member
Network Support I
#7
I made a post on Loctite over on LF a ways back.
Anyways, I've found that the stick forms (think glue stick) are stupidly awesome and convenient compared to the little tubes. I always seem to cut too much of the tip off of the tube, cut myself, use way too much, and then lose them. The ONE quirk with these is that they won't retract back in once you twist the knob to expose more. So...don't turn it until you need it. It also helps you can find the stuff on Amazon, with Prime shipping.

Blue: http://amzn.to/1cjpxOs
Red: http://amzn.to/1HLUNE1

I've also found that I'm a fan of Vibratite VC3 for applications where I may be fiddling with something a bit. It's similar in retention force to Loctite Blue, but reusable a few times before you have to reapply it. Having it in a small jar with applicator brush makes it fairly pleasant to work with as well. That being said, I'm just a pharmacist, so I could be going about this the entirely wrong way.

Vibratite VC3: http://amzn.to/1Rojbgw
 
#8
The trick with anything you loctite is that if you disassemble, CLEAN THE OLD SHIT OFF. Use a solvent and clean the inside and outside threads as well as you can. The anaerobic chemical goodness that makes thread locking compounds work needs good solid contact with metal to fully activate. Unscrewing something and then reassembling with more new thread locker will do you no good.

I am not in manufacturing anymore, so I have not extensively played with the stick types, but it initially looks good. I question penetration into small thread locations given it is not a fluid, but will need more time to suss it out.

Adam_s, the trick with the tubes is to use a small pair of diagonal cutters and clip the tip as close to the seal as possible, especially with Blue 242 (243 is a little less runny, and doesn't flow from the tube like the ending of a porno). Small hole is your friend.
 
#9
Glad to hear it; we now do that ourselves as part of the assembly process, but a little more LocTite is rarely a bad thing.



- Jake
Right up until you have to disassemble a $20k sensor system that the new assembler used the wrong type of Loctite on, liberally.

Also, FYI, keep Lactate away from polycarbonates. THEY DO NOT MIX! Loctite will degrade some plastics and polycarbonates. We found that out the hard way when the polycarbonate sensor domes we had secured using thread locked fasteners started flying off the units in vibratory testing. That was embarrassing...
 

JBowles

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Network Support I
#10
I'd also recommend having some purple and green on hand as well.

Purple for real small stuff <1/4" that may need to be removed or repositioned.

Green tightish fitting non-thread parts you want to stay together or seal, like gas blocks or clamp type free float hand guards. Use sparingly because it will creep everywhere.
 

ggammell

Established
Network Support I
#11
How about the best way to break blue loctite? Particularly on a Glock front sight. Some heat and go or is anything else needed?
 
#14
I use 242 on my Glock front sights and even though the screw is little and a pain I've always just brute strengthed them out without heat. Having a good tool helps a lot for doing it without heat. I don't recall the price but the front fight tool from the Glock Store is probably a good investment for anyone with Onevor more Glocks. Edpecially since almost everyone who knows any better replaces the factory sights.
 
#16
Correct me if I'm wrong here, but is there actually much point in blue loctite on a Glock front sight given it's placement in relationship to the barrel and any heat radiating from the barrel after firing?

For my past few recerts, the Glock armorer instructors always talk about clear nail polish since it's not broken down by heat but isn't permanent.
 
#17
Correct me if I'm wrong here, but is there actually much point in blue loctite on a Glock front sight given it's placement in relationship to the barrel and any heat radiating from the barrel after firing?

For my past few recerts, the Glock armorer instructors always talk about clear nail polish since it's not broken down by heat but isn't permanent.
I've never had a problem with the front sight coming loose using 242. Nor have I ever had a problem making it break free when I needed it to break free. Even with the heat that's generated in the vicinity the sight stays put until I need it to move. I suppose if I were a true knuckle dragger scraping my fingers on the ground, too, I might actually have clear nail polish at hand. ;)
 
#18
Mojo, I'm sure you can use the sparkly kind too if you'd like o_O.

I honestly don't know how nail polish actually responds to the kind of heat the Glock front sight would be exposed to. Lord knows, you have to have your BS filter on point for any factory sponsored armorer course. I've always wondered if that was a legit "hack" as the kids would say. I haven't had any issues with loctite either but then again I don't know how much of that is due to torque/installation method. We've had some come loose...some loctited; some not but its hard to say when not all were installed by the same person.

Shifting gears, one thing I do NOT loctite at all are scope rings/ring caps.
 
#19
I'll bet I could find some sparkly stuff on the HH6's side of the vanity. If I look hard enough.:D

I just got an invitation to an engineering seminar put on by the Henkel group/Loctite's parent company I believe. It's local to me. About 3 miles from work. Actually at the local Scheels store. Hmmm, could be a good one worth attending.
 

Yondering

Regular Member
#20
Correct me if I'm wrong here, but is there actually much point in blue loctite on a Glock front sight given it's placement in relationship to the barrel and any heat radiating from the barrel after firing?

For my past few recerts, the Glock armorer instructors always talk about clear nail polish since it's not broken down by heat but isn't permanent.
A Glock front sight doesn't see anywhere near the level of heat required to break down Loctite.