The Roland Special

Jordan G.

Newbie
So, I just finished assembling my Roland Special. I want to preface this by telling my early experience in 2017 with the KKM comp on a Glock 19 Gen 4.In early 2017, I obtained my first KKM comp. During testing I was running Blazer 9mm 115 gr bullets and some Fiocchi 115 gr ammo. At that time, the gun would not run properly due to lack of added power to the cartridge, some missing modifications to the pistol and keeping the comp secured on the barrel.

After my disappointing range session, I did some homework on how to make the gun run properly. After perusing the P&S forum and asking some questions, I was guided to running hotter ammo and lighter springs. I also used blue Loctite to keep the setscrews in the comp.Upon obtaining an ISMI 13 pound spring and a ZEV guide rod kit for a Gen 4 Glock and using some hotter ammo (1190 fps+), I went back to the range with the same result. The gun did not run reliably with the added accessories. I had some stovepipes to contend with and feeding issues. In addition to the extraction and feeding issues, I still had a problem of keeping the comp's set-screws secured with blue Loctite. Also my fiber optic front sight was dumped with expelled power and could not get a bright fiber optic front. After this session, I was disappointed with the result. I eventually sold the comp and the accessories in 2017.

Fast forward a year and some change, there was a part of me nagging me to re-evaluate the Roland Special concept. After a much thorough homework session on what made the gun work and giving the concept to mature a little bit, I finally completed my build thanks to ATEi, Overwatch Precision, Wolff, Primary & Secondary and Chuck Pressburg.

In this re-evaluation, I ensured I ran hotter ammo (+ p or + p +), used actual components to compliment the gun. Moreover, I ensured proper Loctite (Vibra-TITE VC-3) was used to keep the comp secure with its setscrews.

Yesterday I ran my Roland Special G19 Gen 4 and it ran great. Before, I did any range time I conducted a function test of the pistol to ensure it ran with all of its components.

(Ammunition for the test was as follows: 115gr S&B, 115gr Winchester, 124gr +p Gold Dot, Magtech 115gr +p+ and Winchester 124 NATO)

The function test was broken down in this manner:
-4 mags of one round of 9mm - Test slide lock
-One 10 round mag of 9mm -load one round in chamber, took magazine out and shot two handed, test extraction
-One 10 round mag of 9mm - loaded one round in pistol, took magazine out and shot limp wristed, test extraction
-One 10 round mag of 9mm - mag dump to see extraction pattern.

I came up with this test from a 1911 extractor test. Before everyone comes at me that Glocks are not 1911s, I hear you. I am focusing my test on one part of the pistol, which is the extractor. I want to emphasize that using a stock Glock extractor on a Gen 4, this test would not work since I've tried it before in 2017 and after replacing the extractor with the Apex extractor, #32074 ejector and SP01176 spring loaded bearing it worked for me.

After the pistol passed the 170 round function test, I proceeded shooting around 300 rounds through the pistol of 124gr NATO. After 300 rounds and counting, lets say that the comp worked much better with the added power in the cartridge and validated the viability of the concept to me with hotter loads.

Here is my current set up of my pistol for everyone’s SA:
Wolff +power trigger spring
Wolff -power plunger spring
Overwatch Precision DATv2
Apex extractor#32074 ejector
SP01176 spring loaded bearing
KKM Comp 9mm

Hope my piece gives a prospective builder an idea of some of the hurdles I initially faced and how it led to a successful conclusion.
 

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Slim

Jerk Ingredients Off
Staff member
Moderator
Yeah Vibratite was the ticket for me as well.

Mine also had fte issues for the first 100 or so rounds, then was suddenly ok. Tried a 13lb recoil spring and didnt like it, went back to stock. Rest is setup as laid out in the "Make your stock glock rock" article, aside from an NP3 trigger bar and disconnector.

Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk
 

Jordan G.

Newbie
Yeah Vibratite was the ticket for me as well.

Mine also had fte issues for the first 100 or so rounds, then was suddenly ok. Tried a 13lb recoil spring and didnt like it, went back to stock. Rest is setup as laid out in the "Make your stock glock rock" article, aside from an NP3 trigger bar and disconnector.

Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk
Yea I had to ask another forum which I don’t recall at the moment on which set screw compound do they use for the comp and I was introduced to the Vibratite. After that, never looked back since haha.
 

David Mayeur

Regular Member
It may have been stated previously, but unless you are dedicated to shooting low power factor ammunition, you shouldn't be altering spring weight. If you are having issues with the factory RSA and the comp, it's the ammo. There are multiple factors that can cause issues, but it is almost always the ammo. The lowest power ammunition I could run without issue with the factory RSA was CCI Blazer Brass 115gr. It's relatively slow and I think it barely meets minor power factor.
 

Yondering

Regular Member
Yea I had to ask another forum which I don’t recall at the moment on which set screw compound do they use for the comp and I was introduced to the Vibratite. After that, never looked back since haha.

If you're willing to do it, it helps a lot to use locking compound directly on the barrel threads, rather than just the screws. That does make the comp harder to get off, but not impossible. I prefer doing this because it makes the comp installation rock solid and less likely to come loose than just locking the set screws. Vibratite, Loctite, etc all work for this. I use Loctite 243 myself.
 

Gypsy EDC

Regular Member
If you're willing to do it, it helps a lot to use locking compound directly on the barrel threads, rather than just the screws. That does make the comp harder to get off, but not impossible. I prefer doing this because it makes the comp installation rock solid and less likely to come loose than just locking the set screws. Vibratite, Loctite, etc all work for this. I use Loctite 243 myself.
+1 once you get it set up the way you want it!
 

Wake27

Regular Member
I thought anti-seize was recommended on the actual barrel. I’ve never had mine come loose, I’ll have to keep an eye out. And I could typically get through a mag of Blazer Brass with one or two malfunctions, and that was with a pretty worn out RSA. I just replaced it as I was having issues with all kinds of loads (had at least 5k rounds on it I think) and have only put a few more mags through it so far, but it functioned well with weak Freedom munitions reloads. Weird how there can be so much many differences in nearly identical builds.


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djsticky

Amateur
Those who have had issues with the comp set screws backing out. Do you remember if you followed the thread locker of your choice's recommended curing time?

I have installed my KKM with Loctite 242 three times now. Initial install, after about 2200 rounds and then after another 3000 or so. Each time cleaned the screws and holes with rubbing alcohol and allowed 24 hours curing time on the thread locker. I also use anti-seize on the barrel threading.

I'm not sure how everyone else would define "got the gun hot frequently" but my range sessions have ranged from leasurly marksmanship practice to sessions dedicated to FAST Drills or Bill Drills or several hundred rounds of doubles where it needed a good 15 minutes to cool before I would even THINK about walking out of the bay with it in my pants.
 

ggammell

Does not pass up an opportunity to criticize P&S.
I used the Loctite High Temp Red on my set screws. I don't think those things are coming out any time soon.
 

JohnN

Newbie
After trying Vibra-tite several times and had no luck keeping the set screws tight. Switched to Loc-tite and never had anymore issues. Total degreasing of the screws and holes is key, IMO.

Tried running a 13 lb. spring but it wouldn't go into battery occasionally. The stock recoil assembly worked as did a 15 lb. recoil spring which I prefer.
 

Slim

Jerk Ingredients Off
Staff member
Moderator
Prep work for the set screws IS an important thing. As well as giving it ample time to set per individual instructions.

Had the same issue with lighter RSA. Another issue for me was slide cycling faster than my ability. I'm not at a level where faster cycling is the next step.

Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk
 

djsticky

Amateur
After trying Vibra-tite several times and had no luck keeping the set screws tight. Switched to Loc-tite and never had anymore issues. Total degreasing of the screws and holes is key, IMO.

Tried running a 13 lb. spring but it wouldn't go into battery occasionally. The stock recoil assembly worked as did a 15 lb. recoil spring which I prefer.

Agreed on prep work.

I arrived at the same setup as you have with recoil springs. The stock worked fine, 13lb worked fine for me but I ended up preferring the balance of the 15lb. I feel like the comp helps mitigate the small amount of extra flip from a lighter spring and the 15 sent the slide home with the right amount of force for the way I'm gripping the gun currently. I had some nose diving with the stock RSA, it lands perfect with the 15. I don't have any nose diving problems without a comp probably because the force of the slide going home has a little more flip to fight and it tracks back naturally as intended by the manufacturer.

Interesting little things you figure out when you get in tune with your gun.
 

MojoNixon

Established
Those who have had issues with the comp set screws backing out. Do you remember if you followed the thread locker of your choice's recommended curing time?

I have installed my KKM with Loctite 242 three times now. Initial install, after about 2200 rounds and then after another 3000 or so. Each time cleaned the screws and holes with rubbing alcohol and allowed 24 hours curing time on the thread locker. I also use anti-seize on the barrel threading.

I'm not sure how everyone else would define "got the gun hot frequently" but my range sessions have ranged from leasurly marksmanship practice to sessions dedicated to FAST Drills or Bill Drills or several hundred rounds of doubles where it needed a good 15 minutes to cool before I would even THINK about walking out of the bay with it in my pants.
Loc-Tite 242 is not really a high temp version if I recall the spread sheet I have at work. It worked for me, however.
I used 271 red on the barrel threads.
I wouldn’t use Vibra-tite if it were free. Used it at my last job in Ca for 8 years and it just did not work until we had their engineers come out and develop a process specific to our needs ( low temp/ high pressure on the order of 2000 PSI).
 

djsticky

Amateur
Loc-Tite 242 is not really a high temp version if I recall the spread sheet I have at work. It worked for me, however.
I used 271 red on the barrel threads.
/QUOTE]
Correct it is not high temp, it is the "blue" variety. I was dubious on my first install because I figured screws going into the end of the explodey fire breathing thing seemed like the exact use case when you would WANT high temp thread locker. It was all I had at the time though and has worked great.
 

MojoNixon

Established
Correct it is not high temp, it is the "blue" variety. I was dubious on my first install because I figured screws going into the end of the explodey fire breathing thing seemed like the exact use case when you would WANT high temp thread locker. It was all I had at the time though and has worked great.
There are many blue varieties and red varieties and other colors, which is why I have always been kind off stickler for referencing the number of the version bring used or talked about. Their properties vary greatly which is why we use about 10 to 15 different versions of both blue and red at work.
 

Yondering

Regular Member
Guys, a comment on the prep work: If you're using blue Loctite 242, you absolutely must clean both the set screws and the threaded holes with some sort of solvent. (Alcohol is sort of OK, things like carb or brake cleaner or laquer thinner, acetone, etc are better.)

Or, you can make things easier and use blue Loctite 243 instead, which is specifically formulated to work in the presence of oil, and does the same job as 242. Removing the oil is still better even with 243, but if you don't get it all or don't have a good solvent handy, 243 will still bond well.
 

djsticky

Amateur
Good point Mojo. I don't really know the differences between them, I don't use them much. 242 is what I find myself using on all my holster hardware and gun stuff that needs loctite.
 

rudukai13

Too Established
anyone have experience running or building a compensated Glock in CA? how did you go about attaching the comp?

You'll need a system that doesn't require a threaded barrel. Luckily, several manufacturers have already prepared for the prospect of CA gun owners wanting comped guns and have prepared a selection of options;

https://www.mayhem-syndicate.com/sh...m-wbarrel-for-g191726-pre-order-black-nitride

https://www.strikeindustries.com/shop/products/glocktm/si-g4-scomp.html

https://www.weaponsarmamentresearch.com/products/war-l-o-c-lock-on-compensator

They all have different features and attachment methods, so you'll need to do some research and determine which you like best.

Another feasible option would be to send your slide off to an out-of-state gunsmith and have them install a more traditional threaded barrel and comp combo, then pin and weld the comp to the barrel to make it a permanent fixture. That will likely be the costliest option, but if none of the above products appeal to you it would be the way to go
 
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