Look for advice on IFAK/Car First aid kit

#1
Fair warning, I am not a medical guy, and the whole of my medical training includes a cpr cert and a first aide merit badge in boy scouts 10 years ago.

But I keep a couple of first aid kits around and here is what I came up with and I wonder what you more medically trained and .mil guys think.

So I started out with this

https://www.amazon.com/Northbound-T...&sr=8-1-spons&keywords=northbound+train&psc=1

I keep on on a battle belt with a Israeli bandage stuck in the front pouch and Im going to through a CAT though the bottom. I figure the basic kit had enough "boo boo" kit stuff for minor injuries and if you have an extremity injury you use the TQ, if its on someones trunk use the bandage, and if worse comes to worse the Israeli bandage wrapper can be used as a chest seal.

Is there anything wrong with this much equipment. I figure the best I am trained to do is try to stop any leaks in myself or someone else so they don't bleed out before EMS arrives, and if someone goes into shock maybe put a blanket on them and thats about it.

Am I missing anything here or am I on the right track?
 
#2
Also I keep one in my car, on my "Tactical" belt for using at the range or in a match or if there is a bump in the night, one at my desk at work, and one in my car, and Im giving one to my girlfriend to keep in her car so I want to make sure I got everything set up for all this stuff
 
#3
Nothing wrong with your equipment, but if you're projected need is GSW or any type of hemorrhage control, look for some specific training. Time matters in those cases, and you don't want to be figuring out how to open the package of your Izzy or TQ, and then trying to figure out how to use it, under stress, when your buddy or yourself are bleeding out.

Look for a TCCC, TECC, CMAT, etc. class in your area. It could save a life, that life could be yours.
 
#4
Nothing wrong with your equipment, but if you're projected need is GSW or any type of hemorrhage control, look for some specific training. Time matters in those cases, and you don't want to be figuring out how to open the package of your Izzy or TQ, and then trying to figure out how to use it, under stress, when your buddy or yourself are bleeding out.

Look for a TCCC, TECC, CMAT, etc. class in your area. It could save a life, that life could be yours.
Good stuff I am looking into some training.

In the next year I have a 2 day carbine class coming up taught by a guy who was a medic overseas and a trauma nurse here in the states that has about a 2 hour section on buddy aid/IFAK use so that will be good.

I figure that is a good start and I should look into some more training. That same guy has a half day "CCW first Aid class", and I will look into some other medical classes weather through the red cross or someone else.

I also bought an Isreali bandage that was expired from a surplus shop awhile ago to practice with. So here is a question, what would you think about every time you do dryfire practicing a few reps of using a bandage or TQ?
 
#5
I also bought an Isreali bandage that was expired from a surplus shop awhile ago to practice with. So here is a question, what would you think about every time you do dryfire practicing a few reps of using a bandage or TQ?
Always a good idea to do repetitive training. Two things though - An Izzy won't expire, but, just like a TQ, have a trainer and a new one. Don't ever use either for the other purpose. CATs are available in different colors for differentiation.
 
#6
Always a good idea to do repetitive training. Two things though - An Izzy won't expire, but, just like a TQ, have a trainer and a new one. Don't ever use either for the other purpose. CATs are available in different colors for differentiation.
Very good.

Would a knockoff or surplus TQ be good enough for training?
 
#7
Very good.

Would a knockoff or surplus TQ be good enough for training?
No. The reason being, they break, and they break easily (which is why you need to buy from a reputable source). So not only are you having to replace them, you won't get the "feel" of how much torque you need to stop blood flow. A TQ properly deployed will hurt. Hurt means you're doing it right.
 
#8
No. The reason being, they break, and they break easily (which is why you need to buy from a reputable source). So not only are you having to replace them, you won't get the "feel" of how much torque you need to stop blood flow. A TQ properly deployed will hurt. Hurt means you're doing it right.
Any word on those stop the bleed classes? I have some being offered by me for free
 
#9
I don't know anything about them personally, and like shooting, it's not the class, it's the instructor(s). For free, definitely take it and see what you get out of it. Then get some references in your area for something more robust and in your wheelhouse.
 
#10
I'll be honest the kit you linked to on Amazon seems more like a boo boo kit than a trauma kit, and if a boo boo kit is what you want that is an alright choice. If you are going for a trauma kit though I would suggest a hemostatic impregnated gauze like combat gauze, either compressed or rolled gauze, two occlusive dressings for trunk wounds, an NPA, and some good training. You already have a good TQ and thats why it isn't in my list. You are already carrying an izzy bandage so I left out a 4"ace wrap, but in the future if you are building another kit don't waste the money on the izzy. Gauze and an ace wrap perform just as well. If you are dealing with a penetrating junctional wound you gotta pack it out Gauze pads just arent going to do the job, in the trunk gets chest seals. I want to give you kudos for looking at the medical side of things. Most of the time medical is over looked in favor of guns, blades and their ancillary equipment.