Glock 19 MOS vs Milled stock G19

#1
Hey guys I'm lookin at using my GSSF coupon for a new G19. I would like to slowly build a Roland and am wondering if the MOS model is rugged enough with an RMR as opposed to a milled slide. The MOS is $60 more than a standard G19. Any first hand accounts of the durability of the MOS mounting would be appreciated, thanks!
 

Lane C

Rico and the Man
Moderator
#2
The MOS G19 is so new I doubt you will get any definitive feedback. I have a MOS and a milled ATEi G19. I am planning on spending time trying to get a comparison of the two. Don't expect anything out soon as far as a review. I usually give feedback on a product after 9-12 months of use and exposure.
 

jwramp

Bird's Eye View
#4
Well think i'm going to pick one up today for $499+ tax
that's tough to argue with. looking forward to any feedback from Lane as well comparing the two - don't think we've seen much side-by-side and if you're not looking for any other fancy slidework it's probably much cheaper to just pick up the MOS if you're shopping for a new one.
 
#6
If going to go with a Red dot G19, I d gomwith one cut specifically for the optic. The MoS wont cowitness sights unless you go with Sights even taller than suppressor sights.

There has been cases of the sights coming off on the MOS pistols because Glock doesnt provide screws for your optic and plate. Make sure if you do go with MOS that you use proper screws. I am skeptical of the whole adapter plate situation.

The MRDS are not as robust as the Aimpoints so that is why I recommend the cowitnessed sights. The LED RMRs can have flicker and dot dosappearing issues due to battery contacts if you dont take a couple of extra steps when mounting. Im also starting to run the Leupold DP Pro and am actually really liking it.
 
#7
Ditto everything kamp has said.

The key to the MOS is to go to your local hardware store and get longer screws for the adapter plate. Traxxus (RC car company) makes the correct length screws. Regarding the RMRs, apply a piece of tape on the battery compartment and you'll be good to go.

Surprisingly, I've also had great experience with the Burris FF 3 8 MOA.


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Jeff82

Has difficulty with months.
#15
The downside to a dedicated slide is it's dedicated. When sights improve and new models come out there's no "changing with the times."

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BassFlats&Beyond

Member
Network Support I
#16
I know this is an old thread but it’s worth reviving. Now that the MOS has been out a while, how is it holding up compared to a quality milled slide? The gen 5 mos is an even more attractive option because the added front serrations and removes the mag well cut out
 

user12358

Regular Member
#17
I know this is an old thread but it’s worth reviving. Now that the MOS has been out a while, how is it holding up compared to a quality milled slide? The gen 5 mos is an even more attractive option because the added front serrations and removes the mag well cut out
I'll chime in with some of my experiences, especially with a Gen 5 MOS. Trijicon now makes a $16 kit that solves the issues that plagued the RMR on a MOS slide initially. With the new screws I haven't been able to find any problems of screws backing out or sights going airborne after around 1000 rounds of +P 9x19 on a Gen 5 17 MOS, not an endurance test by any means but so far it is holding up as it should have in the beginning. However, the MOS system has the RMR riding much higher on the slide than a dedicated mill job. This isn't the end of the world but it is certainly nicer to have the optic lower like milled slides do.

I specifically bought a Gen 5 17 MOS because now I don't have to send it out for front serrations like the Gen 4 MOS and it will be ready to immediately accept an Aimpoint ACRO when it comes out along with any other future optics that are released. For serious use guns I will still always be getting a dedicated mill job because you are only losing flexibility and incurring some extra cost to get a more robust and in most cases lower mount with one less failure or movement point. That being said, I would still have confidence in using the MOS system if it was issued to me and I was unable to use a dedicated mill job slide.
 
#18
I took some measurements today to compare my ATEI-milled Glock 19 Gen 5 to my newly-purchased Glock 17 Gen 5 MOS using the stock MOS RMR plate and the CHPWS RMR plate. I measured from the bottom of the slide to top of the mounting surface:

ATEI w/ Trijicon sealing plate: 0.720"
MOS w/ CHPWS (no Trijicon sealing plate): 0.745"
MOS w/ CHPWS and Trijicon sealing plate: 0.757"
MOS w/ MOS and Trijicon sealing plate: 0.760"

The CHPWS flares out to cover the entire bottom of the RMR, so I don't think it needs the Trijicon sealing plate.

I really like my sight setup on the ATEI Glock 19 and wanted to see if it would work on the MOS before I ordered any sights. I use the Ameriglo GL-404 rear sight (0.304") and Heinie 3186F front sight (0.310"). Here is the co-witness sight picture on the ATEI Glock 19:



And here's the co-witness sight picture on the 17 MOS with CHPWS plate (no Trijicon sealing plate):



I should point out that I don't have the Trijicon MOS kit with the screws needed to secure the RMR to the MOS, so I left the RMR unsecured in both pictures to try to get a fair comparison. They both probably sit a little lower once properly secured.

As far as fit goes, I'm sure it's no surprise to most everyone that the ATEI cut is the hands-down winner between these three. Without any screws, the RMR doesn't budge. The CHPWS plate was an improvement over the stock MOS plate but still had some wiggle without any screws.
 
#19
I have a G17 MOS Gen 4 with a Leupold DeltaPoint Pro mounted on it or I did up until yesterday. The setup has somewhere between 3000-4000 rounds of factory ammo through it. While at the range firing the pistol the screws holding the mounting plate in place sheared off sending the optic flying through the air. The plate screws did loosen once before at about 1000 rounds, but I removed, cleaned, applied more Locite, and torqued the screws as recommended and no problems since. Glock is taking care of the matter and as always they were very helpful. However, I was wondering is this an issue with slide mounted optics in general and is it an issue more so with the universal cut sides we are seeing on more and more handguns these days versus custom cut slides?
 

Yondering

Regular Member
#20
I have a G17 MOS Gen 4 with a Leupold DeltaPoint Pro mounted on it or I did up until yesterday. The setup has somewhere between 3000-4000 rounds of factory ammo through it. While at the range firing the pistol the screws holding the mounting plate in place sheared off sending the optic flying through the air. The plate screws did loosen once before at about 1000 rounds, but I removed, cleaned, applied more Locite, and torqued the screws as recommended and no problems since. Glock is taking care of the matter and as always they were very helpful. However, I was wondering is this an issue with slide mounted optics in general and is it an issue more so with the universal cut sides we are seeing on more and more handguns these days versus custom cut slides?
It's an issue with universal cuts for optics. It is not an issue for slides milled for a specific type of optic, when they're done well enough to support the optic properly.

Out of curiosity so I can understand your failure better, did the screws actually break off in the plate holes, or did they strip the threads out?