Glock 19.3 Issue

#21
Baffle strikes are usually copper colored when using jacketed bullets, it's not uncommon to have silver colored deposits inside comps, they can be caused by exposed lead in the base of bullets getting burned. The compensators I've seen for Glocks have a generous bore so that shouldn't be a problem but you should have clearance checked by putting a bore sized ground rod in the barrel and making sure there is good clearance all around. I have seen compensators get loose while shooting due to heat build up loosening up the loctite and then tighten back up when cooled off, this makes it tough to locate the source of a baffle strike. If you have a strike you need to find the cause because it will happen again, so you might want to check to see if you can move the comp when it's hot.

The chance of tolerance stack up always exists especially when combining parts from different manufacturers. It should never happen but I've sent pistol barrels back that the bore wasn't concentric with the outside.

It sounds like you need to go to a lighter recoil spring to solve your ejection problems, you tried 15 so try a 13. The weight on the barrel and the compensating action both cause extra drag on the barrel which slows unlocking, so a lighter spring is needed to get everything back in balance. I'm not a Glock expert so I can't say how light you can go without having other problems, I've gone as light as 8lbs on 1911s.
 

MojoNixon

Regular Member
#22
Baffle strikes are usually copper colored when using jacketed bullets, it's not uncommon to have silver colored deposits inside comps, they can be caused by exposed lead in the base of bullets getting burned. The compensators I've seen for Glocks have a generous bore so that shouldn't be a problem but you should have clearance checked by putting a bore sized ground rod in the barrel and making sure there is good clearance all around. I have seen compensators get loose while shooting due to heat build up loosening up the loctite and then tighten back up when cooled off, this makes it tough to locate the source of a baffle strike. If you have a strike you need to find the cause because it will happen again, so you might want to check to see if you can move the comp when it's hot.

The chance of tolerance stack up always exists especially when combining parts from different manufacturers. It should never happen but I've sent pistol barrels back that the bore wasn't concentric with the outside.

It sounds like you need to go to a lighter recoil spring to solve your ejection problems, you tried 15 so try a 13. The weight on the barrel and the compensating action both cause extra drag on the barrel which slows unlocking, so a lighter spring is needed to get everything back in balance. I'm not a Glock expert so I can't say how light you can go without having other problems, I've gone as light as 8lbs on 1911s.
I've already checked everything at work. I am an ASQ certified mechanical inspector so I'm totally up to speed on concentricity and have several methods to check it. Even after the issue the barrel checks out to be well within .001". More like 7 tenths. Plenty of clearance, too. Didn't get a hard number for clearance but a ground .3570 303 SST rod had visible clearance, I'm 20-Blind but can still discern a gap in the carbide tips of my mics as small as 3 tenths and this was significantly more. I should have but did not check all this prior to putting it together.
It was cheap WWB 115 gr. so a non concentric projectile with a poor seal going down the bore may have caused the projectile to yaw causing the strike.
 
#23
I've already checked everything at work. I am an ASQ certified mechanical inspector so I'm totally up to speed on concentricity and have several methods to check it. Even after the issue the barrel checks out to be well within .001". More like 7 tenths. Plenty of clearance, too. Didn't get a hard number for clearance but a ground .3570 303 SST rod had visible clearance, I'm 20-Blind but can still discern a gap in the carbide tips of my mics as small as 3 tenths and this was significantly more. I should have but did not check all this prior to putting it together.
It was cheap WWB 115 gr. so a non concentric projectile with a poor seal going down the bore may have caused the projectile to yaw causing the strike.
That's great you have been able to check the comp alignment to eliminate that potential issue. Anything is possible I guess but think about how a bullet has to be close enough in size to chamber and then would be swaged into shape screaming down the barrel at that speed no matter how it starts out, then to yaw coming out the muzzle. I don't have your academic credentials but I've built a large number of comped pistols professionally and shot at least a jillion rounds thru them competing for fourty years and I've never seen that happen. Best of luck figuring it out.