Dumb spring question

Steven Cali

Member
Network Support I
#1
I've seen a bunch of mentions of people running lighter recoil springs in their Glocks, around 13 lbs, if I recall correctly, so that they will run flatter, which doesn't seem like it suits my gun or needs, but I noticed in my internet browsing that there are heavier recoil springs available for them, and I can't find any information on their use. Is there any good reason for those to exist? It seems to me that it might reduce wear for some guns, such as Glock 22s, that run hotter ammo than the typical 9mm, but it also seems that they might also end up with significant reliability issues.
 

Steven Cali

Member
Network Support I
#3
Going too light or too heavy takes you out of the operational window. Unless you have specific needs (and those are usually associated with competition and gamer stuff) I'd stick with factory weights.
Yeah, I figured that was the case, but I was really wondering why such a thing would exist.
 

tylerw02

Regular Member
#8
I've seen a bunch of mentions of people running lighter recoil springs in their Glocks, around 13 lbs, if I recall correctly, so that they will run flatter, which doesn't seem like it suits my gun or needs, but I noticed in my internet browsing that there are heavier recoil springs available for them, and I can't find any information on their use. Is there any good reason for those to exist? It seems to me that it might reduce wear for some guns, such as Glock 22s, that run hotter ammo than the typical 9mm, but it also seems that they might also end up with significant reliability issues.
If your gun isn’t broken, don’t try to fix it. Glocks are sprung from the factory for full pressure ammo. The guys running lighter springs are for mousefart ammunition or training ammo, and at times, competition.




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