Complex Carbohydrates Immediately Post Workout?

#1
I recently started paying a lot more attention to what I am eating. I have been good about not eating any junk food etc. My question is in regards to carbohydrates after a workout.

I stay away from processed sugars and carbs, but from reading around I see that it's recommended to eat simple carbs immediately after a workout for quicker digestion.

What I will usually eat right after a workout is about 1 cup of plain non-fat greek yogurt mixed with 1 scoop of whey concentrate protein powder. I will mix in dry fruit, such as dates, figs, some kind of dry berry etc.

1) I found that while dry fruit is high in sugar, it can also be high in fiber. Does the fiber slow digestion of the protein and/or sugar?

2) I also read that fructose doesn't digest as quickly as other sugars, does this technically make fruit a complex carb?

3) Sometimes instead of dried fruit, I will mix in raw oatmeal and let it sit overnight with the yogurt mix so that it's ready the next morning after my workout. I know oatmeal is a complex carbohydrate. Does eating complex carbs immediately post workout slow digestion of protein in a way that hinders recovery?

The common theme is that you want to refuel properly 30 to 60 minutes post workout. So is it possible that eating complex carbs with your protein right after a workout could be detrimental in any way?

I realize I may be overthinking things, but I figured for anyone already putting in the time to watch what they eat and maintain a proper diet this could be helpful info.

Thanks in advance
 
#3
I'm not a doctor, nor do I play one on the internet. That being said, the dried fruit I'm your post workout meal won't kill you and won't derail all that work you're putting in. Honestly, that post workout breakfast is pretty solid. That may change as your nutritional needs change, but until they do, stick with what you've got going on.
 

Sonofstate

Newbie
Network Support I
#4
Mixing Carbohydrates with any protein or fat slows their absorption to a pretty constant level. There is also a lot of confusion surrounding the "anabolic window" is much larger than most people think. In most cases, it's 24 hours(the exception being chemically enhanced athletes). At the end of the day what you have over the 24 hour period is what you really need to worry about(unless you're a chemically enhanced athlete looking for that tenth of a percent advantage).
 
#5
You want fast digesting carbs, dextrose, maltodextrine, etc. You want high glycemic foods to replace the glycogen burnt in the muscles.
 
#6
I'm not a doctor, nor do I play one on the internet. That being said, the dried fruit I'm your post workout meal won't kill you and won't derail all that work you're putting in. Honestly, that post workout breakfast is pretty solid. That may change as your nutritional needs change, but until they do, stick with what you've got going on.
It's been working so far, so I will stick with it. I was just thinking if there's anything I can be doing better.

Mixing Carbohydrates with any protein or fat slows their absorption to a pretty constant level. There is also a lot of confusion surrounding the "anabolic window" is much larger than most people think. In most cases, it's 24 hours(the exception being chemically enhanced athletes). At the end of the day what you have over the 24 hour period is what you really need to worry about(unless you're a chemically enhanced athlete looking for that tenth of a percent advantage).
This is the first time I have heard this. Everywhere I've read it's mostly been 30 - 60 minutes post workout is the most crucial as far as what you eat. Do you have a link to the info you gave? I don't doubt what you said at all, I'm just interested in reading about it.

You want fast digesting carbs, dextrose, maltodextrine, etc. You want high glycemic foods to replace the glycogen burnt in the muscles.
This is what I've always understood. Where I got confused was:

Fruit has a high sugar content, meaning high glycemic. At the same time, I've read that fruit sugar is absorbed slower. How much slower I don't know, and furthermore I don't know if it's slow enough to be considered low glycemic.

Thanks for the replies.
 

tact

Regular Member
#7
I'm not a doctor, nor do I play one on the internet. That being said, the dried fruit I'm your post workout meal won't kill you and won't derail all that work you're putting in. Honestly, that post workout breakfast is pretty solid. That may change as your nutritional needs change, but until they do, stick with what you've got going on.
It's been working so far, so I will stick with it. I was just thinking if there's anything I can be doing better.

Mixing Carbohydrates with any protein or fat slows their absorption to a pretty constant level. There is also a lot of confusion surrounding the "anabolic window" is much larger than most people think. In most cases, it's 24 hours(the exception being chemically enhanced athletes). At the end of the day what you have over the 24 hour period is what you really need to worry about(unless you're a chemically enhanced athlete looking for that tenth of a percent advantage).
This is the first time I have heard this. Everywhere I've read it's mostly been 30 - 60 minutes post workout is the most crucial as far as what you eat. Do you have a link to the info you gave? I don't doubt what you said at all, I'm just interested in reading about it.

You want fast digesting carbs, dextrose, maltodextrine, etc. You want high glycemic foods to replace the glycogen burnt in the muscles.
This is what I've always understood. Where I got confused was:

Fruit has a high sugar content, meaning high glycemic. At the same time, I've read that fruit sugar is absorbed slower. How much slower I don't know, and furthermore I don't know if it's slow enough to be considered low glycemic.

Thanks for the replies.
Watch Shredded Sports Scientist on the tube. He is an actual sports scientist and using actual scientific data debunks a lot of the popular myths perpetuated by the supplement companies and charlatans.
 
#8
Watch Shredded Sports Scientist on the tube. He is an actual sports scientist and using actual scientific data debunks a lot of the popular myths perpetuated by the supplement companies and charlatans.
I'll check it out, thanks for the recommendation! The bro science and supplement company nonsense drives me up a wall.