Breaking down weapon lube options

#41
When I was taking care of range rental guns, I used either Slip or mpro7. Usually dunked the disassembled gun in the ultrasonic, blow if off and a few drops of lube, then back to the wall.

Did work on a customer's Saiga 12 that wouldn't cycle. Gas ports were completely carboned up. Used non-chlorinated brake cleaner to soften up the carbon and dental picks to get the ports clean.
 
#42
We do not recommend using WD40 on firearms, as it is a water displacer. When WD40 dries, it leaves a gummy varnish, and can cause issues. Banana oil based solvents like Hoppe's-9 will also leave a gummy varnish, so if using this stuff then make sure you rinse it away. I have seen several handguns that wouldn't fire due to massive amounts of dried gummy varnish from evaporated Hoppe's-9, where they were soaking the gun weekly which caused a gummy build up behind the breech face so the firing pin couldn't go forward enough to ignite a primcr.

What we teach in armorer courses is to use solvents and lubricants that are made for use on firearms. Can you use other products, yes, but you could cause issues. Simple Green is a great degreaser, the problem with it is that it eats anodizing, and you do not want to remove any of the type-3 hard coat anodizing that is on things, as type-3 hard coat anodizing is in a sense a plating that protects the aluminum. Snow Bowl toilet cleaner eats parkerizing and bluing within seconds. I have also seen hydraulic fluid and brake cleaner eat finishes. Safety Clean carburetor cleaner eats plastic, anodizing, stock finishes, bedding compound, tile flooring, etc. After using any solvent, my preference is to make sure it is totally removed by wiping things down with denatured alcohol to remove any solvent, oil or grease.

My preferences when it comes to cleaning firearms are Slip2000 products like the 725 Cleaner Degreaser for all around cleaning, Carbon Cutter/Killer (Works well at removing fouling inside shotgun barrels, and for black powder), Barrett Solvent for precision & sniper rifles, and Sweet's 762 Solvent for heavy copper, and Kroil for heavy carbon. For lubricants I prefer Slip2000 "EWL" Extreme Weapons Lube, and "EWL30". I teach to use the "EWL" for all around lubrication and rust protection, as it flows nicely into all the little crevices and holes, reduces friction greatly, and protects very well from rust. The "EWL30" is what I put where I need a lube to stick and not run, places like handgun rails, roller bearings on M14/M1A/M1 rifles, etc. The "EWL" I have used at -37F, and I have also used the "EWL30" at -34F, and both performed well. I am based in MN, and we need gun lubricants that perform in sub-zero temps. The "EWL" has also performed well when running instructor courses in San Antonio when its 120F, and it doesn't burn off even when shooting lots of full auto.

CY6
Greg Sullivan "Sully"
 
#43
I use M1 10-30 oil and red grease where oil and grease are needed. I treat my carry guns how carry guns should be treated, and all others are shooters, which get treated like cars.

Old cars that burn oil.

How many designer lube companies out there actually formulate their own lubes in their own labs, outside of Lucas oils?
 
#44
When I worked at a indoor range there was a customer shooting a AR that kept having issues. I had him bring it over to the work bench so I could take a look at it. I manually cycled it and then when looking at the ejection port I could smell the WD-40. (I never realized how distinct the smell of WD-40 was until working around firearms) I looked at the customer and asked:

"Sir, did you lube this with WD-40?"

Customer: (Pauses for a second and shakes head) "No."

I threw on some gun oil and handed it back to him to try while kind of explaining that firearms work best with a lube designed for firearms. His AR ran without issue after that.
 

Darth Tater

Regular Member
Network Support I
#45
Disclaimer: I shoot for Lucas Oil Outdoor Line/receive financial benefit from them, and represent their product line in the shooting community. That said, I used their stuff before I formed a relationship with them.

I used one of the other popular lubes in this thread for years. Then I was exposed to Lucas Oil's Extreme Gun Oil (some try-it-out samples). I found that it was lubricating consistent with my experience with other really good lubricants, but the difference was that it had a higher viscosity. In other words, it was a little tackier...it stayed where I put it, continued lubricating where I put it, and didn't run off as quickly as some others. I had to apply it less often for equal effect, and had less mess to clean up later. I also never took a face or shirt full of lube-splatter off a cycling bolt carrier. The higher viscosity didn't produce any negative fouling issues either.

The other thing I really enjoyed about Lucas products is (as mentioned previously about another product line) they have an entire family of products. I use their Gun Grease, Extreme Duty Gun Oil, CLP, Contact Cleaner, and Bore Solvent every time I clean. The products work incredibly well, have solid laboratory science and a skilled petroleum development company behind them, and they're great people to deal with.

I started using Lucas Oil products before I ever entertained a relationship with the company, and stand behind the products based on my experience with them. Competitive shooters tend to run guns that are significantly tighter in tolerance than MILSPEC or out of the box guns. Lube that will run any Glock won't always perform well in a hand-fit 2011, for instance. I've never seen a gun that didn't run Lucas products exceptionally well. Their Gun Grease has helped a LOT of less-than-100% custom semi-auto shotguns go 100% reliable. Some of the best shooters in the competitive space who could have their choice of company's products delivered by the pallet choose to run Lucas products exclusively (Jerry Miculek, as just one example).

The last thing I'll say about Lucas is that they're committed to the shooting community and shooting sports. I'm a big proponent of supporting the companies that support us (especially in the competitive shooting arena). Lucas is a premier sponsor of a lot of major matches across a lot of disciplines, to include being a major 3 Gun Nation sponsor. Pro staff shooters are available at Lucas-sponsored events at a cleaning station to both demo and educate people on products, and to help shooters with nasty guns get their reliability back. We don't do it simply because we are affiliated with Lucas, but because we enjoy helping folks try out and learn about the products.

If you shoot 3 Gun and you will be at the Pro-Am, FNH Multigun Championships, East Coast Ironman, or 3 Gun Nation Nationals, hit me up and I'll bring you some Lucas product to try out for yourself. If you find yourself in Central Florida, the offer stands as well.
 
#46
I used to use Italian gun grease, but discontinued its use after a winter. The stuff gummed up after being frozen. I keep an AR in a safe in my POV. I watched a video on weapons shield and have been using it for almost a year now. I like the stuff and haven't seen any issues develop. I'm really only using it on my glock at AR for now.
 
#47
Due to health issues I don't get to shoot much if at all anymore compared to the amount of shooting I used to do.

I put a wet patch of Tetra down the bore of my long range bolt guns before putting them in the safe. I use Slip EWL on everything else.

If I wanted to use Slip EWL down the bores next time, what should I do to keep from mixing the two (ie Slip EWL + the Tetra that is already in the bore)?
 
#49
If I wanted to use Slip EWL down the bores next time, what should I do to keep from mixing the two (ie Slip EWL + the Tetra that is already in the bore)?
We spend time in every armorer course we teach going through maintenance that pertains to each weapon system we are teaching on. I am not a fan of mixing any solvents or lubricants, as there is always a possibility of a bad reaction. To remove the Tetra from your barrel, swab it out with denatured alcohol, as this will remove the oil, grease, water, and solvent, then it will dry quickly. Dentured alcohol can be found in just about any paint department at Home Depot, Lowes, hardware stores, Walmart, etc.

CY6
Greg Sullivan "Sully"
SLR15 Rifles
TheDefensiveEdge.com
(763) 712-0123
 
#50
Sounds like denatured alcohol is an easy enough neutralizer. Thank you Sully.


We spend time in every armorer course we teach going through maintenance that pertains to each weapon system we are teaching on. I am not a fan of mixing any solvents or lubricants, as there is always a possibility of a bad reaction. To remove the Tetra from your barrel, swab it out with denatured alcohol, as this will remove the oil, grease, water, and solvent, then it will dry quickly. Dentured alcohol can be found in just about any paint department at Home Depot, Lowes, hardware stores, Walmart, etc.

CY6
Greg Sullivan "Sully"
SLR15 Rifles
TheDefensiveEdge.com
(763) 712-0123
 
#51
I keep all my cleaning stuff in my garage. It doesn't get terribly cold in North Georgia during the winter but it does dip below freezing a bit. I've noticed that when it does, my bottle of RAND CLP will freeze up into a hard lube slushy and be unusable.

I've been using Slip2000 and Ballistol for the most part lately.