Breaking down weapon lube options

#21
I used froglube the past year until this winter it froze up my gun. Moved on to several products that I am testing out. I work in a gun shop, that mostly deals with shotguns as we are on a private hunting club. We use Rand CLP exclusively on shotguns. I am no scientist, but here is my feedback on RandCLP:

It is very light and doesn't take much. I don't feel it stops carbon build up as well as other CLPs, but I do think it protects from friction and lasts. So, since we are on a hunt club, biggest issues to shotguns aren't carbon, it is dirt, debris, and making sure people actually lubricate (and clean) their shotgun. RandCLP has performed very well and it doesn't take much at all. Anytime I run 5-Stand or patrol our sporting clays, I always take a bottle of RandCLP. If anyone complains about their semi not functioning, I always drop Rand in, usually fixes the issue of no lube or not clean.

Another bonus due to it being light, is we use it to protect the outside of firearms as well. I can drip some on the firearm and wipe it down. I can tell the product is there but it doesn't feel oily or slick. So, again, great to protect in the field.

I did an interview with Jon and RandCLP here:
http://practacpodcast.com/pto005/ (also available on itunes/stitcher)

I don't have much experience with their Cleaner either, but plan too this summer. I don't have much experience using RandCLP in an AR, but plan too as well.

I am also currently testing out Breakthrough Clean's 2 new lubricants (NOT CLPs) as I really love their solvent and switched our tank to it at work. I actually used their Battle Born Oil to fix my frozen frog lube gun at the range from a drip packet. Ran like a champ. I haven't been able to dry out their Grease yet.

Hope something in my ramblings helped.
 
#24
I've been using Slip on all my duty guns for years and never found a reason to look elsewhere...until now. Not trying to derail the thread, but does anyone have any preference for antique firearms (think WWI-WWII era)? I have read that the original GI grease pots were not the best for protecting or lubing and wanted to see if anyone has tried the Slip grease products for things like the M1 Garand/Carbines. These really don't get shot much at all (maybe a total of 50 rounds per year), but I want them to be treated right.
 

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#25
I've been using Slip on all my duty guns for years and never found a reason to look elsewhere...until now. Not trying to derail the thread, but does anyone have any preference for antique firearms (think WWI-WWII era)? I have read that the original GI grease pots were not the best for protecting or lubing and wanted to see if anyone has tried the Slip grease products for things like the M1 Garand/Carbines. These really don't get shot much at all (maybe a total of 50 rounds per year), but I want them to be treated right.
My M1 carbine loves normal Slip 2000 EWL fwiw.
 
#28
Good to know! I too have been using Slip 2000 for the old girls in my collection for the time being but figured that going to a thicker grease type solution might be better for the lugs on the bolt and high wear parts in particular. Thanks for the input!
 
#29
I havent used it. However Michael Lamb is one dude I trust that does.

Simply put, I am so satisfied with SLIP that I have honestly had no need to look elsewhere. It is good to have alternatives.

There are only a handfull I will not use. Frog lube, WD40, Militec are a big fat No.

Most importantly I try to uses products from the same company, like the slip EWL/EWG, 725, Carbon Killer. They are made to work together.

Do not mix companies products. Solvents especially have rowdy ingredients that dont play nice together.
Agree with all of this, except that I *have* been tempted and tried out various new-hotness, unicorn-jizz, lubes and coatings, and find myself using up the free sample (or, more often, simply losing it or giving it away) and going back to what I know works for me.

I use the Slip family of products, and apply the higher viscosity lubes at home when working on guns at the bench (stays put, less likely to run in the safe) and lower viscosity at the range (easier to squirt in and spread around without touching it or breaking down the gun/parts).
 
#31
Another happy Slip user. I recently bought a bottle of Fireclean to try out on my .22's, specifically suppressed ones and on the internals of the SilencerCo Sparrow I recently took possession of.


Can somebody smart talk about using brake (as in automobile) cleaner to clean guns? Good/Neutral/Fuckin' Dumb? I've got a guy that busted out the big ol' can of Brake Kleen to clean his Glock and patrol rifle the other day, and I had a hard time articulating why it was frigging stupid beyond "that shit is for cars, they make gun products for guns".

A short little blurb I could copy and email him would be bestest, if you please!
 
#32
I used Slip 2000 EWL over the winter for High Power Rifle matches and it worked flawlessly. The weather was in the teens with wind chills below zero and also snowing at times. A lot of guys had trouble with their rifles freezing up using RemOil or Frog Lube. I had no troubles at all. I actually had icicles on my upper receiver below my charging handle from my breath and nose drippings were freezing. I use it on all my rifles and pistols and have not had any issues.

I would like to try Fire Clean, but I figure if its not broken, why fix it?
 
#33
Can somebody smart talk about using brake (as in automobile) cleaner to clean guns? Good/Neutral/Fuckin' Dumb? I've got a guy that busted out the big ol' can of Brake Kleen to clean his Glock and patrol rifle the other day, and I had a hard time articulating why it was frigging stupid beyond "that shit is for cars, they make gun products for guns".

A short little blurb I could copy and email him would be bestest, if you please!

So... Metal is metal, parts is parts. I cannot determine what is wrong with using a non-firearm product on firearms. Guns are nothing more than stupid simple machines that get dirty.

The only concern using some chemicals is what they do to plastic parts, no different than car stuff anyway.


And hell, most gun stuff is repackaged stuff anyway. If your buddy wants to argue I'd ask him what the firearm specific products do and how they differ from generic products. I doubt he'll have an answer.
 
#34
So... Metal is metal, parts is parts. I cannot determine what is wrong with using a non-firearm product on firearms. Guns are nothing more than stupid simple machines that get dirty.

The only concern using some chemicals is what they do to plastic parts, no different than car stuff anyway.


And hell, most gun stuff is repackaged stuff anyway. If your buddy wants to argue I'd ask him what the firearm specific products do and how they differ from generic products. I doubt he'll have an answer.
Didn't I just read two pages where guys were saying metal is not always metal, and parts are not always parts? I.E. using Mobil 1 on guns.....? Or am I missing something. MY argument to HIM was using Brake Kleen is stupid, given the number of products actually designed for use with firearms.
 
#35
Then I got it mixed up... I clearly misread the argument you were making.

But parts are parts. Synthetic motor oil, for example, will work but is not *ideal*. The argument for gun specific products is often weak.

One could very easily make a case against brake cleaner based on the msds sheet alone though. It's not something to fool around with but for once in a while it works quickly and efficiently.
 
#36
I'm often tempted to buy an Olympic Arms AR, Fakepoint, and wolf ammo and only ever clean it with brake cleaner and lube it with Mobil 1, just to see what will really happen. I just don't shoot in the volume I used to for it to probably be a decent test.

My reason for using "gun specific" products is largely that they are labeled as to what they do ("lube", "carbon cutter", "degreaser"), some in bottles/packages that suit my purposes, and at least proclaim (in the case of Slip) to not be quite as toxic as the next thing, and consequently have an inoffensive smell.
 
#38
Well, that's the thing. *IF* it failed and *SEEMED* to do so due to lube/cleaning issues, the counter argument would always be that the user had done something wrong. There's really no way to prove/disprove the argument.

@Lobsterclaw207 , this is really why it's probably pointless to bother talking to the guy about it. You can quote all the "science" to him that you want, and it's unlikely he'll ever change. Even if he somehow had a failure, and the failure was related to his cleaning process/product, he'd be too emotionally invested to admit that was the cause.

Better to just walk away.
 

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#39
Brake cleaners and some other solvents can be hard on some polymer materials--different ones react to different chemicals. Safest bet on non-firearms cleaning solvents is probably Electrical Contact cleaner. It is very specifically designed to not be harmful to polymer components in electric motors, wiring, plugs/connectors, etc. I've used it for years for that reason. It's a couple bucks more than brake cleaners, but still less than most dedicated firearms products.
 
#40
Well, that's the thing. *IF* it failed and *SEEMED* to do so due to lube/cleaning issues, the counter argument would always be that the user had done something wrong. There's really no way to prove/disprove the argument.
You can have lube related failures, I've had many. I don't know that they would be had with a synthetic motor oil though and that's because it meets what I would say the minimum standards are for an AR. That whole IF thing is hard though because we all know that one can fire an unrealistically high round count with a suboptimal lube like synthetic motor oil.


Goes back to what everyone did before the designer lubes came about... Used motor oil or whatever was free. At the time none of the free stuff was inherently bad. Wasn't until people decided that being able to drink your lube was a requirement that lube specific failures became an issue, excluding insufficient lubrication.